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Posts Tagged ‘5G’

Blog Review – Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Monday, September 11th, 2017

We have found ways to tune up the testbench from Cadence; a vision of smart cities from BDTI; the Crotian EV market; and for Mentor and Maxim, it’s competition time!

Introducing the idea of an east European country innovating in automotive design, Alyssa, Dassault Systemes, profiles Rimac Automobili, Croatia, and its Concept_One electric vehicle. The company profile and link with 3DExperience makes an interesting read.

Hoping to change perspectives on testbench practises, the Xteam, Cadence Design Systems, looks into how test time can be reduced for modern SoCs using its Perspec tool.

Trying to put a silver lining on the cloud of the end of the summer, rkasnick, Mentor Graphics, has details of the Digi-Key Electronics Back2School contest (limited to US and Canada students). The offer of free, perpetual license of PADS MakerPro design software is not to be sniffed at, and there are other prizes for young maker engineers.

The news behind the partnership deal with SiFive, to bring embedded analytics to more RISC-V application, are given by Rupert Baines, UltraSoC. More than just a new member of the DesignShare program, could this latest partnership be indicative of a shift happening in the industry for a more democratized design methodology?

It makes sense – time saved at the design stage can translate to more time for interests and hobbies. After a rather clumsy boast about frequent flyer miles nanoMan, Maxim Integrated introduces the EE-Sim Power Designer Challenge. Crossword buffs should give it a go, there’s a chance to win a Garmin fēnix 5 watch.

Clutching his smartphones, Jeff Bier, BDTI, considers embedded vision for smart cities of the future. His ideas for smart cities are not revolutionary, but he concisely identifies the key technologies needed to make computer vision-based systems an opportunity not to be missed.

An insight into what may be in store for 5G is reported on by John Blyler, Chip Design. His report on the Imec Technology Forum Southeast Asia in Singapore, looks at two products developed by imec and the target market of below 60GHz smartphones.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, July 24, 2017

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Let’s hear it for High Fidelity Gaming and it’s all about the IoT, with PCB schematic tips from Mentor and security from Maxim; Inside NI’s 5G test lab and hope for Parkinson’s Disease research

Serious gamers are intriguing Freddi Jeffries, ARM. She looks at High Fidelity Mobile Gaming (HFMG) and who’s adopting it and where. Can mobile devices, based on Mali graphics processing units (GPUs) take on the console market?

A personal and heart-felt post by Altium Designer, Altium, looks at medical advances in treating Parkinson’s Disease. An overview of research by assorted technology companies manages to combine various uses for spoons, concludes with a gentle plug for PCB design software.

Stil with PCBs, John McMillan, Mentor Graphics Design presents part four of an IoT PCB design-themed series. The topic is schematic and layout design, from creating the schematic to component placement and constraint management for effective manufacture.

IoT security is keeping Christine Young, Maxim Integrated occupied – she is keeping busy finding out the scale of cybercrime, and the worrying lack of action companies to take steps for security. She flags up a free webinar on how to safeguard connected devices.

Taking a practical approach is applauded by Michael DeLuca, ON Semiconductor. He likes the attitude of the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, whose students are preparing to launch its Flying Laptop satellite.

Taking a sneaky peek at the National Instruments’ 5G Innovation Lab, Steve Leibson, Xilinx, celebrates the company’s Virtex-7 and Kintex-7 FGPAs use in Verizon’s 5GTF (Verizon 5G Technology Forum) test equipment. The Forum is developing a 28/39GHz wireless communications platform to replace fiber in fixed-wireless applications.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, August 15 2016

Monday, August 15th, 2016

In this collection, we define the IoT, investigate IP fingerprinting, and break into vehicles in the name of crypto-research. There is also prophesizing about 5G and disruption technology for technology, and relationship advice for computing and data.

Empathizing with anyone who has ever struggled with CMSIS RTOS API, Liviu Ionescu, ARM, offers a helping hand, catalogues the issues that can be encountered and reassures designers they are not alone and, more importantly, offers practical help.

Putting IP fingerprints to work may sound like the brief for an episode of CSI, but it is Warren Savage’s, (IP-extreme) recipe for successful SoC tapeout. He does do some CSI-style digging to thoroughly explain how to delve into a chip’s IP to limit the risks associated with IP reuse.

Listening intently at the Linley Mobile Conference, Paul McLellan, Cadence, sees the advent of 5G as good news for high-capacity, high-speed, low-latency wireless networks and linked with all things IoT.

Famous couplings, love and marriage, horse and carriage, could be joined by computing and data. Rob Crooke, Intel, believes that an increase in data and increased computing will transform cloud computing, but that memory storage has to keep up to realize smart cities to autonomous vehicles, industrial automation, medicine, immersive gaming to name a few. His post covers 3D XPoint and 3D NAND technology.

On security detail this week, Gabe Moretti, Chip Design magazine, finds a white paper from Intrinsic-ID that he recommends on the topic of embedded authentication which is vital to the secure operation of the IoT.

At the end of this year, the last Volkswagen Camper, (or kombi) van, will roll off the assembly line in Brazil. Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, includes the iconic vehicle in his post about a hack related in a paper authored by researchers at the University of Birmingham to clone a VW remote entry systems. The paper was presented at the Usenix cybersecurity conference in Austin, Texas, with reassurances that the group is in ‘constructive’ talks with VW.

For a vintage automobile to the latest, EV and PHEVs, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, looks at disruption they may bring to the automotive industry. Referring to account technology manager Paul Johnston’s presentation at 2016 IESF, he touches on the electrical engineering and embedded software challenges as well as the predicted scale of the EV industry.

Still looking at a market rather than the technology, Alex Voica, Imagination Technologies, looks at the IoT. He has some interesting graphs and statistics and asks some interesting questions around definitions, from what is the IoT and what defines a device.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday May 16, 2016

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Ramifications for Intel; Verification moves to ASIC; Connected cars; Deep learning is coming; NXP TFT preview

Examining the industry’s transition to 5G, Dr. Venkata Renduchintala, Intel, describes the revolution of connectivity and why the company is shifting its SoC focus and exploit its ecosystem.

Coming from another angle, Chris Ciufo, Intel Embedded, assess the impacts of the recently announced changes at Intel, including the five pillars designed to support the company: data center, memory, FPGAs, IoT and 5G, with his thoughts on what it has in its arsenal to achieve the new course.

As FPGA verification flows move closer to those of ASICs, Dr. Stanley Hyduke, Aldec, looks at why the company has extended its verification tools for digital ASIC design, including the steps involved.

Software in vehicles is a sensitive topic for some, since the VW emissions scandal, but Synopsys took the opportunity of the Future Connect Cars Conference in Santa Clara, to highlight its Software Integrity Platform. Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, reports on some of the presentations at the event on the automotive industry.

Identifying excessive blocking in sequential programming as evil, Miro Samek, ARM, write a spirited and interesting blog on real-time design strategy and the need to keep it flexible, from the earliest stages.

Santa Clara also hosted the Embedded Vision Summit, and Chris Longstaff, Imagination Technologies, writes about deep learning on mobile devices. He notes that Cadence Design Systems highlighted the increase in the number of sensors in devices today, and Google Brain’s Jeff Dean talked about the use of deep learning via GoogLeNet Inception architecture. The blog also includes examples of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) and how PowerVR mobile GPUs can process the complex algorithms.

This week, NXP FTF (Freescale Technology Forum), in Austin, Texas, is previewed by Ricardo Anguiano, Mentor Graphics. He looks at a demo from the company, where a simultaneous debug of a patient monitoring system runs Nucleus RTOS on the ARM Cortex-M4. He hints at what attendees can see using Sourcery CodeBench with ARM processors and a link to heterogeneous solutions from the company.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 07, 2016

Monday, March 7th, 2016

IP fingerprinting; Beware- 5G!; And the award goes to – encryption; Fear of FinFET; Smart kids; Virtual vs real hardware

Keeping an eye on the kids blends with wearable technology, as demonstrated by the Omate Whercom K3, which debuted at Mobile World Congress 2016. It relies on a 3G Dual-core 1GHz ARM Cortex-A7 and an ARM Mali-400 GPU, relates Freddi Jeffries, who interviews Laurent Le Pen, CEO of Omate.

The role of MicroEJ has evolved since its inception. Brian Fuller, ARM, looks at the latest incarnation, bringing mobile OS to microcontroller platforms such as the ARM Cortex-M.

Rather overshadowned by the Oscars, the winner of this year’s Turing Award could have more impact on everyday lives. It was won, says Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, by Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman for the invention of public key cryptography. His blog explains what the judges liked and why we will like their work too.

The inclusion of a Despicable Me photo/video is not immediately obvious, but Valerie Scott, Mentor Graphics makes a sound argument for the use of a virtual platform and includes a (relevant) image of the blog’s example hardware, the NXP i.MX6 with Vista.

Everyone is getting excited about 5G, and Matthew Rosenquist, Intel, sounds a note of caution and encourages readers to prepare for cyber risks as well as the opportunities that the technology will bring.

Fed up with FinFET issues? Graham Etchells, Synopsys, offers advice on electro-migration, why it happens and why the complexity of FinFETs does not have to mean it is an inevitable trait.

Efficiency without liabilities is the end-goal for Warren Savage, IP Extreme. He advocates IP fingerprinting and presents a compelling argument for why and how.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, June 22 2015

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

Yonsei Uni team up for 5G; Hold that thought; now catch it; ARM and UNICEF; Industry and Education breathe life into EDA; Connected driving clears the road ahead

Researchers at Yonsei University have demonstrated a real-time, full-duplex LTE radio system at IEEE Globecom in Austin, Texas, using a novel antenna approach and working with National Instruments SDR platforms and LabVIEW graphical programming environment, reports Steve Leibson, Xilinx.

“Hold that thought” takes a new turn, as an anonymous blogger at Atmel describes the MYLE TAP, a wearable ‘thought catcher’. The touch-activate and voice-powered device automatically converts thoughts into actions. An interesting prototype or a recipe for disaster if it falls into the wrong hands?

Charity doesn’t always begin at home, sometimes it’s a warehouse in Copenhagen, Denmark. Dominic Vergine, ARM, visited the UNICEF global procurement hub and considers what wearable technology can provide, building on the low-tech, wearable technology of the MUAC band to test for malnutrition.

Building on a presentation at DAC 2015, Richard Goering, Cadence, considers how to academia and industry can work together to revitalize EDA.

The road ahead is smooth for the connected car, reports John Day, Mentor Graphics, if you are driving a Jaguar Land Rover (JLR), anyway. He examines the connected car technology that can identify and share data on potholes, broken manholes and other hazards.

Sloth is a deadly sin, especially in IP software development, warns Tom De Schutter, Synopsys, as he examines how laze in automotive testing can be absolved with virtual prototypes as an alternative to hardware, making earlier, broader, more automated software testing available.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Imec Reports Low-Power IP Blocks for 5G

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Today, at its Imec Technology Forum Southeast Asia in Singapore,imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, will present two key building blocks for future 5G applications featuring record low power consumption. The first is a fast and extremely compact successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC), designed for consumer electronics, such as mobile phones, operating in the below-6GHz frequency bands (4G/5G). Secondly, imec developed a 60GHz front-end with radio frequency (RF) phase shifting and on-chip transmit-receive switching, targeting 5G fixed wireless access and small cell backhaul applications. These building blocks are available to interested companies by joining imec’s industrial affiliation program, or through IP licensing.

5G mobile networks, promise massive connectivity through much higher data rates, lower latency and lower battery consumption than current 4G standards. To realize this, frequencies below 6GHz and also millimeter-wave frequencies, especially at the 57-66GHz unlicensed band, are explored, promising speeds of multi-Gb/s with low latency.

“Imec is developing novel IP building blocks for 5G, operating below-6GHz as well as in the 60GHz frequency band,” stated Wim Van Thillo, program director perceptive systems at imec. “Our portfolio includes record-breaking analog-to-digital convertors (ADCs), reconfigurable low-noise frequency synthesizers, millimeter-wave phased array transceivers, antenna modules and more. These building blocks show state-of-the art performance, excel in low-power operation and are low cost by leveraging scaled CMOS technologies. They give our partners a unique advantage in realizing their next-generation SoC for 5G wireless communication”

Targeting smartphone applications in the below-6GHz band, imec has developed a compact, low-cost, low-power and high-speed (300Ms/s) ADC that meets the requirements of multimode multiband 5G communication. The ADC is a SAR with a reduced core area of only 350µmx 325µm which is fabricated in 16nm CMOS. It achieves a dynamic low power consumption of only 3.6mW at 300Ms/s and low-frequency signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) of 70.2dB at 204MS/s.

Imec also developed a compact, energy efficient and low-cost radio front-end (TRX) that operates at 60GHz. The chip features 8-way calibration-free beamforming at RF frequencies to support a large number of antennas, making the technology attractive for fixed wireless access and small cell backhaul. The on-chip transmit-receive switching allows to share the antenna array between transmit and receive mode. The 9.6mm2 chip is implemented in 28nm CMOS and consumes 231mW in receive and 508mW in transmit mode (0.9V supply).

16nm ADC Chip (Courtesy Imec)

60GHz 8-way phased array TRX front-end chip (Courtesy Imec)

These results are presented at ITF Southeast Asia (Sept 6, Singapore), one of imec’s leading high-tech events, offering an exclusive research and innovation perspective on the emerging opportunities of nanoelectronics and digital technologies. Under the theme “Tech solutions for a smart world”, imec presents innovations on hardware and software innovations that drive a smart society.

About imec

Imec is the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies. The combination of our widely acclaimed leadership in microchip technology and profound software and ICT expertise is what makes us unique. By leveraging our world-class infrastructure and local and global ecosystem of partners across a multitude of industries, we create groundbreaking innovation in application domains such as healthcare, smart cities and mobility, logistics and manufacturing, energy and education.

As a trusted partner for companies, start-ups and universities we bring together close to 3,500 brilliant minds from over 75 nationalities. Imec is headquartered in Leuven, Belgium and also has distributed R&D groups at a number of Flemish universities, in the Netherlands, Taiwan, USA, China, and offices in India and Japan. In 2016, imec’s revenue (P&L) totaled 496 million euro. Further information on imec can be found at www.imec-int.com.

Imec is a registered trademark for the activities of IMEC International (a legal entity set up under Belgian law as a “stichting van openbaar nut”), imec Belgium (IMEC vzw supported by the Flemish Government), imec the Netherlands (Stichting IMEC Nederland, part of Holst Centre which is supported by the Dutch Government), imec Taiwan (IMEC Taiwan Co.) and imec China (IMEC Microelectronics (Shanghai) Co. Ltd.) and imec India (Imec India Private Limited), imec Florida (IMEC USA nanoelectronics design center).