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Blog Review – Monday, November 6, 2017

Monday, November 6th, 2017

This week, we find that ANSYS gets hyper about Hyperloop development, Xilinx puts its mind to networks, Maxim supports factory automation and NXP, Mentor and ON Semiconductor explain why and how a product can be used.

A positively upbeat tone is set by Maxim Integrated’s Jeff DeAngelis, as he looks at how Industry 4.0 and automation is bringing back jobs. He looks at how being competitive through automation is leading to reshoring activity.

The now infamous ‘Jeep hack’ is the starting point for Timo van Roermund, the security architect at NXP considers what safeguards are needed and how the car domain needs to be re-thought for security on the roads. As well as citing several NXP products, there are also some useful links.

There’s a new look to the Mentor Graphics blogs and Michael Nopp uses it to good effect to take us through the company’s PADS Professional. His use of clear, colourful graphics adds to a simply told design guide.

Who isn’t super-excited about Hyperloop technology at the moment? Adora Anound Tadros, HyperXite guests on the ANSYS site to tell us how the team from University of California, Irvine, used simulation tools for its entry in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod competition. The team is gaining momentum and was in the top six of this year’ competition and is planning to compete again in 2018 – with a self-propulsion pod design.

Smile, you’re on camera, says an image-conscious Jason Liu, ON Semiconductor. He looks at the changing roles of cameras in our lives and introduces the company’s digital image sensor.

Another current favourite topic is neural networks. Steve Leibson proudly relates how a team at the University of Birmingham in the UK has implemented a deep recurrent neural network on a Xilinx Zynq Z-7020 SoC using the Python programming language.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday 07 November 2016

Monday, November 7th, 2016

Browsing the MIT Library; AI and HPC for cancer breakthroughs; FPGAs on Mars; Romancing ISO 26262; It’s IoT conference season; Who’s going to pay?

For smart and connected IoT devices, Intel has introduced the Intel Atom processor E3900 and Ken Caviasca, Intel explains how the series brings computing power nearer to the role of the sensor.

Crash scenes from Mars, as taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) reveal features previously unseen on the planet. Steve Leibson, Xilinx, explains how we have FPGAs to thank. (For the images, not the crash!)

Ahead of GE’s Minds & Machines Conference (November 15-16, San Francisco) Lane Lewis, Ansys, celebrates the marriage of the Simulation Platform and Predix Platform to create a profitable asset health monitoring and the industrial IoT.

As mobile payment matures, Martin Cox, Rambus Bell ID, identifies that tokenization is becoming a hot topic. His blog explains the role of the company’s Token Gateway as a means to integrate multiple mobile payment schemes. No excuse not to get a round of drinks in now.

Moving automotive and safety into the realm of Dungeons and Dragons, Paul McLellan, Cadence, reviews the recent DVCon Europe and how ISO 26262 – the critical safety standard – became a theme, but not necessarily one to dread and fear or avoid. Like St George, you just have to grit your teeth and tackle it head-on, to find the pot of gold that is critical safety design success.

Fresh from IoT Planet in Grenoble, France, Andrew Patterson, Mentor Graphics, is occupied by two topics – connectivity and security. He shares some interesting thoughts and statistics around these gleaned from the event.

Fascinating insights into the world of bio-medicine and computational bio-medicine are provided by Dr Michael J McManus, Intel. He explains how Artificial Intelligence (AI) and High Performance Computing (HPC) are used by researchers to analyze data and predicts an era of revolutionary cancer breakthroughs, of both drug development structures and genome analytics running on a single Intel cluster using Intel Xeon, Intel Xeon Phi processors and Intel Omni-Path architecture.

There is a fascinating collection of rare books at MIT, exhibited to mark Ada Lovelace Day. For those can’t walk the aisles of the MIT Libraries, Stephen Skuce, MIT Libraries, shows us through some of the collection relating to women who have contributed to science, math and engineering with its annual celebration of the history of women in the STEM (Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor


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