Part of the  

Chip Design Magazine

  Network

About  |  Contact

Posts Tagged ‘artificial intelligence’

Blog Review – Monday, October 23, 2017

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

This week blogs are focused on health and AI, from remote care for the elderly to asthma inhalers using machine learning; plus sewer cleaning and multimedia SoCs

The autonomous car can reduce hospital visits by visiting patients – but won’t that put more cars on the road? David P Ryan, Intel advocates a delivery service for the next generation of healthcare.

Taking an engineer’s view on every object, Peter Ferguson, Arm, looks at the asthma inhaler and takes a deep breath at the Amiko ‘smart’ inhaler which uses an Arm Cortex-M processor.

Former Cadence employee, Vishal Kapoor, presented Preparing for the Cognitive Era, at San Jose State University. Paul McLellan, Cadence reports on why Kapoor is worried about the amount of data companies are collecting.

The importance of video content, used in augmented reality devices and 4K UHD TV, relies on efficient multimedia SoCs. Richard Pugh, Mentor, looks at some of the ways and means to verify the data and cites an interesting example of a customer developing a drone.

No wonder it’s called Solo – who would want to join RedZone Robotics’ autonomous sewer-inspection robot (called Solo)? Steve Leibson, Xilinx, uncovers the clean workings of the robot that crawls and records where others refuse to go, and explains how it uses Spartan FPGA for image processing and for AI. (There’s a video too – but it’s not a mucky one!)

Enough about the IoT, says Jim Harrison, Lincoln Technology Communications, guest blogging for Maxim Integrated. What about how to connect millions of sensors and actuators? He lays out a comprehensive ‘shopping list’ of long range wireless comms and connection options to help speed up the IoT conversation.

Coming full circle, Marc Horner, ANSYS, relates the case study of computational modeling for insulin delivery systems.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, September 25, 2017

Monday, September 25th, 2017

This week, there are some prophecies: What does the future hold for the IoT and for vehicle design? Why is 3D facial recognition a sound idea and why the world should be divided into 3x3mm pieces.

A trillion devices in the IoT – and counting. Frank Schirrmeisster, Cadence, is worried about security, safety, design and verification and system architectures for the expanding IoT. Will next month’s Arm TechCon be able to allay some of this fears?

Calling for a holistic approach to DVFS, Don Dingee, Sonics, looks at what could be standing in the way of designers and what it might mean for IP sub-systems.

The reality of self-driving cars and the role of the connected car to achieve autonomous vehicles, is addressed by Randall Wollschlager, Maxim Integrated, in a Q&A with Christine Young.

Aiming to unite the world, Colin Walls, Mentor, calls for a universal GPS format that divides the world in to 3x3mm squares for pinpoint precision.

Channeling 007, CircuitStudio author, Altium, looks at the iPhone X and its 3D facial recognition technology, and examines how it’s done and for what ends.

Fresh from a trip to Asia, Sean Safarpour, Synopsys, is full of praise for formal verification and how it has been embraced by companies there.

Better than ‘dad dancing’ the robot dance is celebrated by Bob Rogers, Intel, who reviews the ‘Intel Day at Berkeley’. The event at UC Berkeley highlighted areas of research for AI, IoT, autonomous vehicles and surgeon robots.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, April 24, 2017

Monday, April 24th, 2017

This week’s blogs are concerned with AI and intelligent, connected vehicles, sometimes both. There are quests to find the facts behind myths and searches for answers for power management and software security too.

Is an effective tool for verification, the stuff of legends? Gabe Moretti, Chip Design Magazine, seeks the truth behind Pegasus – no, not the winged horse, the more earthly verification engine from Cadence.

A power strategy is one thing, but a free trial adds a new dimension to energy management. Don Dingee, Sonics, elaborates on the company’s plan to bring power to the masses, using hardware IP and ICE-Grain Power architecture.

If you are unsure about USB, Senad Lomigora, ON Semiconductor’s blog should help. It looks at what it’s for, why we can’t get enough of USB Type C, USB 3.1, connectors and re-drivers.

Every vehicle’s ADAS relies on good visuals, observes Jim Harrison, guest blogger, Maxim Integrated, and good connectivity. He looks at the securely connected autonomous car, and then homes in on explained how Maxim Integrated exploits GMSL, an alternative to Ethernet, in its MAX96707 and MAX96708 chips, to create an effective in-car communication network.

Still with the connected car, Pete Decher, Mentor Graphics, is fresh from the Autotech Council meeting in San Jose. The company’s DRS360 Autonomous Driving Platform launch was high on the list of discussion topics, along with the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of driving.

Still with AI, Evens Pan, ARM provides an in-depth blog on Chinese start-up, Peceptin’s enabled embedded deep learning. The case study is fascinating and well reported in this comprehensive essay.

Making any software engineer feel insecure about software security is an everyday occurrence, helping them out is a little more out-of-the-ordinary, so if it refreshing to see a post from the editorial team, Synopsys, letting the put-upon software engineer know there is a webinar coming soon (May 2) to enlighten them on the Building Security In Maturity Model (BSIMM), with a link to register to attend.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 27, 2017

Monday, March 27th, 2017

How AI can be used for medical breakthroughs; What’s wired and what’s not; A new compiler from ARM targets functional safety; Industry 4.0 update

A personal history lesson from Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, as he charts the evolution from the beginning of the company, via the author’s career and various milestones with different companies and the trials of DAC over the decades.

Post Embedded World, ARM announced the ARM Compiler 6. Tony Smith, ARM, looks at its role for functional safety and autonomous vehicles.

A review of industrial IoT at Embedded World 2017 is the focus for Andrew Patterson’s blog. Mentor Graphics had several demonstrations for Industry 4.0. He explains the nature of Industry 4.0 and where it is going, the role of OPC-UA (Open Platform Communication – Unified Architecture) and support from Mentor.

What’s wired and what’s wireless, asks David Andeen, Maxim Integrated. His blog looks at vehicle sub-systems and wired communications standards, building automation and wired interface design and a link to an informative tutorial.

There are few philosophical questions posed in the blogs that I review, but this week throws up an interesting one from Philippe Laufer, Dassault Systemes. The quandary is does science drive design, or does design drive science? Topically posted ahead of the Age of Experience event in Milan next month, the answer relies on size and data storage, influenced by both design and science.

Security issues for medical devices are considered by David West, Icon Labs. He looks at the threats and security requirements that engineers must consider.

A worthy competition is announced on the Intel blog – the Artificial Intelligence Kaggle competition to combat cervical cancer. Focused on screening, the competition with MobileODT, using its optical diagnostic devices and software, challenges Kagglers to develop an algorithm that classifies a cervix type, for referrals for treatment. The first prize is $50,000 and there is a $20,000 prize for best Intel tools usage. “We aim to challenge developers, data scientists and students to develop AI algorithms to help solve real-world challenges in industries including medical and health care,” said Doug Fisher, senior vice president and general manager of the Software and Services Group at Intel.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

New specs for PCI Express 4.0; Smart homes gateway webinar this week; sensors – kits and tools; the car’s the connected star; Intel unleashes AI

Change is good – isn’t it? Richard Solomon, Synopsys, prepares for the latest draft of PCI Express 4.0, with some hacks for navigating the 1,400 pages.

Following a triumphant introduction at ARM TechCon 016, Diya Soubra, ARM, examines the ARM Cortex-M33 from the dedicated co-processor interface to security around the IoT.

Steer clear of manipulating a layout hierarchy, advises Rishu Misri Jaggi, Cadence Design Systems. She advocates the Layout XL Generation command to put together a Virtuoso Layout XL-compliant design, with some sound reasoning – and a video – to back up her promotion.

A study to save effort is always a winner and Aditya Mittal and Bhavesh Shrivastava, Arrow, include the results of their comparisons in performing typical debug tasks. Although the aim is to save time, the authors have spent time in doing a thorough job on this study.

Are smart homes a viable reality? Benny Harven, Imagination Technologies, asks for a diary not for a webinar later this week (Nov 23) for smart home gateways – how to make them cost-effective and secure.

Changes in working practice mean sensors and security need attention and some help. Scott Jones, Maxim Integrated looks at the company’s latest reference design.

Still with sensors, Brian Derrick, Mentor Graphics Design, looks at how smartphones are opening up opportunities for sensor-based features for the IoT.

This week’s LA Auto Show, inspires Danny Shapiro, NVIDIA, to look at how the company is driving technology trends in vehicles. Amongst the name dropping (Tesla, Audi, IBM Watson) some of the pictures in the blog inspire pure auto-envy.

A guide to artificial intelligence (AI) by Douglas Fisher, Intel, has some insights into where and how it can be used and how the company is ‘upstreaming’ the technology.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday 07 November 2016

Monday, November 7th, 2016

Browsing the MIT Library; AI and HPC for cancer breakthroughs; FPGAs on Mars; Romancing ISO 26262; It’s IoT conference season; Who’s going to pay?

For smart and connected IoT devices, Intel has introduced the Intel Atom processor E3900 and Ken Caviasca, Intel explains how the series brings computing power nearer to the role of the sensor.

Crash scenes from Mars, as taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) reveal features previously unseen on the planet. Steve Leibson, Xilinx, explains how we have FPGAs to thank. (For the images, not the crash!)

Ahead of GE’s Minds & Machines Conference (November 15-16, San Francisco) Lane Lewis, Ansys, celebrates the marriage of the Simulation Platform and Predix Platform to create a profitable asset health monitoring and the industrial IoT.

As mobile payment matures, Martin Cox, Rambus Bell ID, identifies that tokenization is becoming a hot topic. His blog explains the role of the company’s Token Gateway as a means to integrate multiple mobile payment schemes. No excuse not to get a round of drinks in now.

Moving automotive and safety into the realm of Dungeons and Dragons, Paul McLellan, Cadence, reviews the recent DVCon Europe and how ISO 26262 – the critical safety standard – became a theme, but not necessarily one to dread and fear or avoid. Like St George, you just have to grit your teeth and tackle it head-on, to find the pot of gold that is critical safety design success.

Fresh from IoT Planet in Grenoble, France, Andrew Patterson, Mentor Graphics, is occupied by two topics – connectivity and security. He shares some interesting thoughts and statistics around these gleaned from the event.

Fascinating insights into the world of bio-medicine and computational bio-medicine are provided by Dr Michael J McManus, Intel. He explains how Artificial Intelligence (AI) and High Performance Computing (HPC) are used by researchers to analyze data and predicts an era of revolutionary cancer breakthroughs, of both drug development structures and genome analytics running on a single Intel cluster using Intel Xeon, Intel Xeon Phi processors and Intel Omni-Path architecture.

There is a fascinating collection of rare books at MIT, exhibited to mark Ada Lovelace Day. For those can’t walk the aisles of the MIT Libraries, Stephen Skuce, MIT Libraries, shows us through some of the collection relating to women who have contributed to science, math and engineering with its annual celebration of the history of women in the STEM (Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday, August 29, 2016

Monday, August 29th, 2016

This week’s blogs are futuristic, with machine learning, from Intel, augmented reality from Synopsys, smart city software from Dassault Systèmes, questions and answers about autonomous vehicles, and security issues, around devices and MQTT on the IoT.

Artificial intelligence is the next great wave, predicts Lenny Tran, Intel. His post looks at machine learning and Intel’s High Performance Computing architecture is part of the way forward in machine learning.

On a similar theme, Hezi Saar, Synopsys, examines the Microsoft 28nm SoC and is impressed with the possibilities for augmented reality that the HoloLens Processing Units has for this developing marketplace.

If you are dissatisfied with your present office location, Dassault Systèmes has plans for smart faciliites, reports Akio. He describes some illuminating projects using 3D Experience City, real-time monitoring, the IoT and systems operations for a comfortable workspace in smart cities.

It’s all about teamwork according to Brandon Wade, Aldec, who offers an introduction to the AXI protocol. His post summarizes the protocol specifications and shares his revelation at how understanding the protocol opens up a world of design possibilities.

Autonomous cars are occupying a lot of Eamonn Ahearne’s, ON Semiconductor, time. Living in the hotbed of self-drive test, he reads, visits and analyses what is happening and is disappointed that hardware is being eclipsed by software in the popularity stakes.

Also occupied with autonomous vehicles, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, starts with an update on electric vehicles, and moves onto the disconnect between ADAS technologies and autonomous vehicles and the engineering challenges that can be addressed using a single ECU (Engine Control Unit).

Attending the Linley Mobile & Wearables Conference, Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, pays attention to Asaf Ashkenazi of Cryptography Research (now part of Rambus) and his well-illustrated post reports how devices can be secured.

An IoT network, powered by the ISO/IEC PRF 20922 standard MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport) can be at risk, warns Wilfred Nilsen, ARM. It is a sound warning about personal information being vulnerable to MQTT brokers. Luckily, he offers a solution, introducing the SMQ IoT protocol.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 15, 2016

Monday, February 15th, 2016

Research converts contact lens to computer screens; What to see at Embedded World 2016; Remembering Professor Marvin Minsky; How fast is fast and will the IoT protect us?

The possibilities for wearable technology, where a polymer film coating can turn a contact lens into a computer screen are covered by Andrew Spence Nanontechnology University of South Australia’s Future Industries Institute. The lens can be used as a sensor to measure blood glucose levels to a pair of glasses acting as a computer screen.

If you are preparing your Embedded World 2016, Nuremberg, schedule, Philippe Bressy, ARM offers an overview of what will be at his favourite event. He covers the company’s offerings for IoT and connectivity, single board computing, software productivity, automotive and from ARM’s partners to be seen on the ARM booth (Hall 5, stand 338), as well as some of the technical conference’s sessions and classes.

Other temptations can be found at the Xilinx booth at Embedded World (Hall 1, stand 205). Steve Leibson, Xilinx explains how visitors can win a Digilent ARTY Dev Kit based on an Artix-7 A35T -1LI FPGA, with Xilinx Vivado HLx Design Edition.

Showing more of what can be done with the mbed IoT Device Platform, Liam Dillon, ARM, writes about the reference system for SoC design for IoT endpoints, and its latest proof-of-concept platform, Beetle.

How fast is fast, muses Richard Mitchell, Ansys. He focuses on the Ansys 17.0 and its increased speeds for structural analysis simulations and flags up a webinar about Ansys Mechanical using HPC on March 3.

If the IoT is going to be omnipresent, proposes Valerie C, Dassault, can we be sure that it can protect us and asks, what lies ahead.

A pioneer of artificial intelligence, Professor Marvin Minsky as died at the age of 88. Rambus fellow, Dr David G Stork, remembers the man, his career and his legacy on this field of technology.

I do enjoy Whiteboard Wednesdays, and Corrie Callenback, Cadence, has picked a great topic for this one – Sachin Dhingra’s look at automotive Ethernet.

Another thing I particularly enjoy is a party, and Hélène Thibiéroz, Synopsys reminds us that it is 35 years since HSPICE was introduced. (Note to other party-goers: fireworks to celebrate are nice, but cake is better!)

Caroline Hayes, European Editor