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Posts Tagged ‘augmented reality’

Blog Review – Monday, October 23, 2017

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

This week blogs are focused on health and AI, from remote care for the elderly to asthma inhalers using machine learning; plus sewer cleaning and multimedia SoCs

The autonomous car can reduce hospital visits by visiting patients – but won’t that put more cars on the road? David P Ryan, Intel advocates a delivery service for the next generation of healthcare.

Taking an engineer’s view on every object, Peter Ferguson, Arm, looks at the asthma inhaler and takes a deep breath at the Amiko ‘smart’ inhaler which uses an Arm Cortex-M processor.

Former Cadence employee, Vishal Kapoor, presented Preparing for the Cognitive Era, at San Jose State University. Paul McLellan, Cadence reports on why Kapoor is worried about the amount of data companies are collecting.

The importance of video content, used in augmented reality devices and 4K UHD TV, relies on efficient multimedia SoCs. Richard Pugh, Mentor, looks at some of the ways and means to verify the data and cites an interesting example of a customer developing a drone.

No wonder it’s called Solo – who would want to join RedZone Robotics’ autonomous sewer-inspection robot (called Solo)? Steve Leibson, Xilinx, uncovers the clean workings of the robot that crawls and records where others refuse to go, and explains how it uses Spartan FPGA for image processing and for AI. (There’s a video too – but it’s not a mucky one!)

Enough about the IoT, says Jim Harrison, Lincoln Technology Communications, guest blogging for Maxim Integrated. What about how to connect millions of sensors and actuators? He lays out a comprehensive ‘shopping list’ of long range wireless comms and connection options to help speed up the IoT conversation.

Coming full circle, Marc Horner, ANSYS, relates the case study of computational modeling for insulin delivery systems.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review –Monday, October 24 2016

Monday, October 24th, 2016

The how, what and why of time-of-flight sensors; Conference season: ARM TechCon 2016 and IoT Solutions Congress; Save time on big data analysis; In praise of FPGAs; Is it time for augmented and virtual reality?

Drastically reducing big data analysis is music to a data scientist’s ears. Larry Hardesty reports on researchers at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have presented an automated system that can reduce preparation and analysis from months to just hours.

Keeping an eye on the nation’s bank vaults, Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, looks at the what bank regulators are doing to ramp up cybersecurity.

If you can’t head to Barcelona, Spain this week for IoT Solutions World Congress (October 25-27), Jonathan Ballon, Intel, reveals what the company will unveil, including a keynote: IoT: From Hype to Reality, what 5G means, smart cities and a hackathon.

Tired of the buzz, and seeking enlightenment, Jeff Bier, Berkeley Design, delves into just what is augmented reality and virtual reality. He examines hardware and software, markets and what is needed for widespread adoption.

Closer to home, 2016 ARM TechCon, in Santa Clara, California (October 25 – 27), Phil Brumby, Mentor Graphics, offers a heads-up on its industrial robot demo, using Nucleus RTOS separated by ARM TrustZone, and the ECU (Engine Control Unit) demo in a Linux-hosted In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) system. There is also a technical session: Making Sure your UI makes the most of the ARM-based SoC (Thurs, 10.30am, Ballroom E)

The role of memory is reviewed by Paul McLellan, Cadence Design System, as he discusses MemCon keynotes by Hugh Durdan, VP of the IP Group and Steve Pwalowski, VP of Advanced Computing Solutions at Micron. There is comprehensive pricing strategy and a look at industry trends.

A teardown of the Apple iPhone 7, by Dick James, Chipworks, links STMicroelectronics’ time-of-flight sensors with the Starship Enterprise. The blog has a comprehensive answer to questions such as what are these sensors and why are they in phones.

If the IoT is flexible, Zibi Zalewski, Aldec, argues, then FPGAs can tailor solutions without major investments in an ASIC. He takes Xilinx’s Zynq-7000 All-Programmable SoC as a starting point and illustrates how it can boost performance for IoT gateways.

Elegantly illustrating how multiple Eclipse projects can be run on a single microcontroller with MicroEJ, Charlottem, ARM, runs through a connected washing machine that can communicate via Bluetooth, MQTT, Z-Wave and LWM2M.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday, August 29, 2016

Monday, August 29th, 2016

This week’s blogs are futuristic, with machine learning, from Intel, augmented reality from Synopsys, smart city software from Dassault Systèmes, questions and answers about autonomous vehicles, and security issues, around devices and MQTT on the IoT.

Artificial intelligence is the next great wave, predicts Lenny Tran, Intel. His post looks at machine learning and Intel’s High Performance Computing architecture is part of the way forward in machine learning.

On a similar theme, Hezi Saar, Synopsys, examines the Microsoft 28nm SoC and is impressed with the possibilities for augmented reality that the HoloLens Processing Units has for this developing marketplace.

If you are dissatisfied with your present office location, Dassault Systèmes has plans for smart faciliites, reports Akio. He describes some illuminating projects using 3D Experience City, real-time monitoring, the IoT and systems operations for a comfortable workspace in smart cities.

It’s all about teamwork according to Brandon Wade, Aldec, who offers an introduction to the AXI protocol. His post summarizes the protocol specifications and shares his revelation at how understanding the protocol opens up a world of design possibilities.

Autonomous cars are occupying a lot of Eamonn Ahearne’s, ON Semiconductor, time. Living in the hotbed of self-drive test, he reads, visits and analyses what is happening and is disappointed that hardware is being eclipsed by software in the popularity stakes.

Also occupied with autonomous vehicles, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, starts with an update on electric vehicles, and moves onto the disconnect between ADAS technologies and autonomous vehicles and the engineering challenges that can be addressed using a single ECU (Engine Control Unit).

Attending the Linley Mobile & Wearables Conference, Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, pays attention to Asaf Ashkenazi of Cryptography Research (now part of Rambus) and his well-illustrated post reports how devices can be secured.

An IoT network, powered by the ISO/IEC PRF 20922 standard MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport) can be at risk, warns Wilfred Nilsen, ARM. It is a sound warning about personal information being vulnerable to MQTT brokers. Luckily, he offers a solution, introducing the SMQ IoT protocol.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor


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