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Driving To the Shops with Graphics and Bluetooth

Monday, January 29th, 2018

The car’s the star this week, as bloggers look to upgrade models, examine the safety systems, and look at how to use graphics. Other posts concentrate on retail therapy and how Bluetooth can help warehouses manage stock and processes

There’s only 330 days shopping days until Christmas, and Intel’s Ryan Parker’s blog could change how those days pan out as retail is redefined with IoT, artificial intelligence (AI), and digital signage combined with video to make the shopping experience to not only meet customer demands, but changing supply chains too.

Examining the backbone of automotive safety systems, Sandeep Taneja, Synopsys, presents an informed and well-illustrated post on what is needed and for what purpose in safety conscious vehicles.

Graphics double data rate (GDDR) memory has evolved to exceed the realm of gamers and is now used in vehicles. A blog by Rambus charts the changes and benefits of graphics technology for both inside and outside the car, and how it can be used in other markets.

The spread of the industrial IoT brings opportunities for warehouses of the future, writes Torbjørn Øvrebekk, Nordic Semiconductor. He looks at what the Bluetooth Mesh standard will mean and the benefits it will bring for networks and energy useage.

Corrie Callenbach, Cadence, has identified a great video hosted by Nick Heaton, distinguished engineer, Cadence, describing the verification challenges for SoCs when integrating CCIX (Cache Coherent Chip-to-Chip Protocol) IP.

Aligning CAD to a car leads an anonymous blogger at Altium to reminisce about old cars owned, cared for, restored, driven and abandoned when adulthood beckoned and manages to make a comparison with upgrading to the 64-bit world where PCB designers now live and work. Nostalgia mixes with practical tips on scaling up.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

A review from CES, and looking ahead to 2018; How the IoT will develop in industry and prototyping; Autonomous driving research; the value of HBM

Research commissioned by Arm around the road to autonomous vehicles is detailed in a blog by Andy Moore. He provides a link to a white paper that touches on the state of ADAS today and what the industry is doing to develop robotaxis and autonomous driving.

After a weather and travel round-up, Paul McLellan, Cadence, highlights some of the news from CES 2018. He alights on automotive and the car designed by Dream Chip and Globalfoundries in the company’s suite and highlights from vehicle manufacturers and semiconductor companies. He also takes in a 5G keynote, TVs, augmented reality, holographs, drones, 3D printing and welcomes robots.

There are many ideas for the IoT, and how to prototype them, with dwindling ranks of hardware and software developers, is perplexing Pär Håkansson, Nordic Semiconductor. He proposes a web-based platform to ‘plug the gaps’ and the company’s own Thingy:52 and nRF Cloud to configure IoT prototypes.

For centuries, people have wanted to know what the future holds. Some mystics have attempted to predict what is to come, some with more success than others. IHS Markit limits itself to identifying transformative technologies for this year. The checklist is analysed in a white paper that can be loaded free of charge.

Another soothsayer is Chet Hellum, Intel, who is not exactly sticking his neck when he says the IoT is going to be big in 2018. His blog looks at how the IoT will drive manufacturing trends in 2018 and the benefits investments can bring to a smart factory.

The role of memory in high bandwith graphics, high performance computing and artificial intelligence will present verification challenges. Shaily Khare, Synopsys examines the structure and strengths of High Bandwith Memory (HBM), the enhancements of HBM2 and how to exploit its properties.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, September 25, 2017

Monday, September 25th, 2017

This week, there are some prophecies: What does the future hold for the IoT and for vehicle design? Why is 3D facial recognition a sound idea and why the world should be divided into 3x3mm pieces.

A trillion devices in the IoT – and counting. Frank Schirrmeisster, Cadence, is worried about security, safety, design and verification and system architectures for the expanding IoT. Will next month’s Arm TechCon be able to allay some of this fears?

Calling for a holistic approach to DVFS, Don Dingee, Sonics, looks at what could be standing in the way of designers and what it might mean for IP sub-systems.

The reality of self-driving cars and the role of the connected car to achieve autonomous vehicles, is addressed by Randall Wollschlager, Maxim Integrated, in a Q&A with Christine Young.

Aiming to unite the world, Colin Walls, Mentor, calls for a universal GPS format that divides the world in to 3x3mm squares for pinpoint precision.

Channeling 007, CircuitStudio author, Altium, looks at the iPhone X and its 3D facial recognition technology, and examines how it’s done and for what ends.

Fresh from a trip to Asia, Sean Safarpour, Synopsys, is full of praise for formal verification and how it has been embraced by companies there.

Better than ‘dad dancing’ the robot dance is celebrated by Bob Rogers, Intel, who reviews the ‘Intel Day at Berkeley’. The event at UC Berkeley highlighted areas of research for AI, IoT, autonomous vehicles and surgeon robots.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, May 22, 2017

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

This week’s collection looks at what’s needed for autonomous cars; Qt tackles flaky tests, Sonics seeks wonderment, and blogs for design advice

Just as drivers choose their cars to meet their needs, so driverless cars need an assortment of processors, argues Intel’s Kathy Winter. She likens the designer’s toolbox to a golf bag with something for every dilemma encountered.

Reporting from the bi-annual GENIVI meeting in Birmingham, England, Andrew Pattersen, Mentor Graphics, learns that big data ownership could be a bone of contention in the next business model for the automotive industry.

Autonomous automotive development requires a thorough understanding of a variety of protocols for automation, electronics control and software. Jaspreet Singh Gambhir, Synopsys, explains how verification offerings can accelerate design.

It is always fun to hear about design mishaps and Sudhir Sharma, ANSYS, entertains with some he has come across to explain why digital twins and physics-based simulation not only meets design objectives but can save costs and boost profitability.

Where’s the wonder?, wonders Randy Smith, Sonics, marveling at why more people were impressed at the Machine Learning Developers Conference as he learned about Wave Computing’s dataflow for deep learning.

Consistency is key for Frederik Gladhorn, Qt, as he investigates a metric infrastructure for what he calls flaky tests, which hamper a design’s progress, with some practical advice and examples.

Speaking directly to anyone struggling with multiple layer design, Parul Agarwal, Cadence Design Systems, has some thoughts and advice on how to use a multi-layer bus. The blog is illustrated with some useful images as a practical guide for anyone struggling with layer patterns.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 27, 2017

Monday, March 27th, 2017

How AI can be used for medical breakthroughs; What’s wired and what’s not; A new compiler from ARM targets functional safety; Industry 4.0 update

A personal history lesson from Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, as he charts the evolution from the beginning of the company, via the author’s career and various milestones with different companies and the trials of DAC over the decades.

Post Embedded World, ARM announced the ARM Compiler 6. Tony Smith, ARM, looks at its role for functional safety and autonomous vehicles.

A review of industrial IoT at Embedded World 2017 is the focus for Andrew Patterson’s blog. Mentor Graphics had several demonstrations for Industry 4.0. He explains the nature of Industry 4.0 and where it is going, the role of OPC-UA (Open Platform Communication – Unified Architecture) and support from Mentor.

What’s wired and what’s wireless, asks David Andeen, Maxim Integrated. His blog looks at vehicle sub-systems and wired communications standards, building automation and wired interface design and a link to an informative tutorial.

There are few philosophical questions posed in the blogs that I review, but this week throws up an interesting one from Philippe Laufer, Dassault Systemes. The quandary is does science drive design, or does design drive science? Topically posted ahead of the Age of Experience event in Milan next month, the answer relies on size and data storage, influenced by both design and science.

Security issues for medical devices are considered by David West, Icon Labs. He looks at the threats and security requirements that engineers must consider.

A worthy competition is announced on the Intel blog – the Artificial Intelligence Kaggle competition to combat cervical cancer. Focused on screening, the competition with MobileODT, using its optical diagnostic devices and software, challenges Kagglers to develop an algorithm that classifies a cervix type, for referrals for treatment. The first prize is $50,000 and there is a $20,000 prize for best Intel tools usage. “We aim to challenge developers, data scientists and students to develop AI algorithms to help solve real-world challenges in industries including medical and health care,” said Doug Fisher, senior vice president and general manager of the Software and Services Group at Intel.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 13, 2017

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Among this week’s topics: two important announcements: the OpenFog Consortium and IEEE Standard for the Functional Verification Language e; a panel discusses the Internet and beyond; Mentor Graphics applies IoT to PCB design; FASTR accelerates the connected car and why USB is not as easy as 123

The importance of IP blocks is a given, but Rocke Acree, ON Semiconductor, explains how selection also has to consider technology and support tools. The company has collaborated with Hexius Semiconductor to qualify analog IP blocks to reduce design cycles and development time.

There are specific constraints, challenges and design requirements for PCBs designed for the burgeoning IoT market. John McMillan, Mentor Graphics has created a two-part blog focused on this topic.

Doing a quickstep around the topic of USB, Eric Huang, Synopsys, explores verification and FPGA prototyping for best results. He recommends some design rules, a test site, then curiously, throws in some political comment, a film review and dance-related jokes to end the blog.

It may not be an understatement by Rhonda Dirvin, ARM, to say that the day the OpenFog Consortium announced its reference architecture is the day we have all been waiting for. Hyperbole? Possibly not, as it defines how secure, interoperable products should be built – just what the connected world needs. She helpfully includes a link to the architecture, and a heads-up on a presentation at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain (Feb 27 to March 3).

If there is an award for Most Apt Acronym, the Future of Automotive Security Technology Research (FASTR) consortium, must be a contender. The uncredited Rambus blog reviews the brief history of the consortium, and discusses its recent manifesto, looking at why it is need for a secure, connected vehicle industry.

2017 begins with the publication of IEEE Std 1647 2016, the IEEE Standard for the Functional Verification Language e. of 2017. Efrat Shneydor, Cadence Design, looks at the enhancements which have been made and proficiently summarizes the highlights.

Generic connectivity is not enough – NASA has been designing, building and launching satellite systems with the goal of providing connectivity throughout the world. The concept and realities of the Internet of Space is the panel discussion topic, reported by John Blyler, Chip Design Magazine.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Moving on from 4K and 8K, Simon Forrest, Imagination Technologies, reports on 360° video, as seen at this year’s CES in Las Vegas. That, together with High Dynamic Range (HDR) could re-energize the TV broadcasting industry in general and the set-top box in particular.

The IoT is responsible for explosive growth in smart homes with connectivity at their centre. Dan Artusi, Intel, considers what technologies and disciplines are coming together as it introduces Intel Home Wireless Infrastructure at CES 2017.

Announcing a partnership with Renault and OSVehicle, ARM will work with the companies to develop an open source platform for cars, cities and transportation. Soshun Arai, ARM, explains how the ‘stripped down’ Twizy can release the brakes on CAN development.

Some Christmas reading has brought enlightenment to Gabe Moretti, Chip Design, as he unravels the mysteries of CEO comings and goings, and why the EDA industry could learn a thing or two from the boards of spy plane and stealth bomber manufacturers.

Still with EDA, Brian Derrick, Mentor Graphics, likens the automotive industry to sports teams, where big names dominate and capture consumers’ interest, eclipsing all others. This is changing as electric vehicles become a super power to turbo charge the industry.

It’s always good to welcome new blogs, and Sonics delivers with its announcement that it is addressing power management. Grant Pierce, Sonics, introduces the technology and product portfolio to enhance design methods.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, December 19, 2016

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Today’s the day -Bluetooth 5 and ARM is ready; A vision for disruptive technologies; When being better connected counts; Memory – the jewel in the crown; Functional Safety, in three video parts

At the launch of Bluetooth 5, Paul Williamson, ARM, celebrates the contribution of the ARM Cordio IP, qualified to Bluetooth 5 standards, available on the day that qualifications are available.

Gearing up for some disruption in the automotive market, Jeff Bier, Berkley Design, anticipates the role of computer vision and how it is central to autonomous vehicles. His view has shifted from an enhancement for the automotive industry to a transforming force.

Functional safety is adroitly explained by Charles Qi, highlighted by Corrie Callenbach, Cadence Design System. This is the second of a three-parter Whiteboard Wednesdays video series – all well worth a viewing.

Jeff Klaus, Intel, is wondering where has Pokémon Go, gone. His blog looks at the demands on data centers for the future and the world of connectivity of IoT, wearables, navigation devices and their impact on enterprise servers.

https://www.mentor.com/products/fv/blog/post/-that-s-unusual-memory-consistency-acc55210-aa68-41ea-95a3-9f598548e7ec

An audacious jewelery heist by elderly thieves inspires Russell Klein, Mentor Graphics Design, to ponder how Big Data and memory was their downfall, and how CodeLink brings memory consistency.

The connected world is occupying Joe Bryne, NXP and the danger posed by malicious software running on internet connected devices, with a touch of ‘I told you so’, and advocating prevention is better than cure.

Blog Review – Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

New specs for PCI Express 4.0; Smart homes gateway webinar this week; sensors – kits and tools; the car’s the connected star; Intel unleashes AI

Change is good – isn’t it? Richard Solomon, Synopsys, prepares for the latest draft of PCI Express 4.0, with some hacks for navigating the 1,400 pages.

Following a triumphant introduction at ARM TechCon 016, Diya Soubra, ARM, examines the ARM Cortex-M33 from the dedicated co-processor interface to security around the IoT.

Steer clear of manipulating a layout hierarchy, advises Rishu Misri Jaggi, Cadence Design Systems. She advocates the Layout XL Generation command to put together a Virtuoso Layout XL-compliant design, with some sound reasoning – and a video – to back up her promotion.

A study to save effort is always a winner and Aditya Mittal and Bhavesh Shrivastava, Arrow, include the results of their comparisons in performing typical debug tasks. Although the aim is to save time, the authors have spent time in doing a thorough job on this study.

Are smart homes a viable reality? Benny Harven, Imagination Technologies, asks for a diary not for a webinar later this week (Nov 23) for smart home gateways – how to make them cost-effective and secure.

Changes in working practice mean sensors and security need attention and some help. Scott Jones, Maxim Integrated looks at the company’s latest reference design.

Still with sensors, Brian Derrick, Mentor Graphics Design, looks at how smartphones are opening up opportunities for sensor-based features for the IoT.

This week’s LA Auto Show, inspires Danny Shapiro, NVIDIA, to look at how the company is driving technology trends in vehicles. Amongst the name dropping (Tesla, Audi, IBM Watson) some of the pictures in the blog inspire pure auto-envy.

A guide to artificial intelligence (AI) by Douglas Fisher, Intel, has some insights into where and how it can be used and how the company is ‘upstreaming’ the technology.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday 07 November 2016

Monday, November 7th, 2016

Browsing the MIT Library; AI and HPC for cancer breakthroughs; FPGAs on Mars; Romancing ISO 26262; It’s IoT conference season; Who’s going to pay?

For smart and connected IoT devices, Intel has introduced the Intel Atom processor E3900 and Ken Caviasca, Intel explains how the series brings computing power nearer to the role of the sensor.

Crash scenes from Mars, as taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) reveal features previously unseen on the planet. Steve Leibson, Xilinx, explains how we have FPGAs to thank. (For the images, not the crash!)

Ahead of GE’s Minds & Machines Conference (November 15-16, San Francisco) Lane Lewis, Ansys, celebrates the marriage of the Simulation Platform and Predix Platform to create a profitable asset health monitoring and the industrial IoT.

As mobile payment matures, Martin Cox, Rambus Bell ID, identifies that tokenization is becoming a hot topic. His blog explains the role of the company’s Token Gateway as a means to integrate multiple mobile payment schemes. No excuse not to get a round of drinks in now.

Moving automotive and safety into the realm of Dungeons and Dragons, Paul McLellan, Cadence, reviews the recent DVCon Europe and how ISO 26262 – the critical safety standard – became a theme, but not necessarily one to dread and fear or avoid. Like St George, you just have to grit your teeth and tackle it head-on, to find the pot of gold that is critical safety design success.

Fresh from IoT Planet in Grenoble, France, Andrew Patterson, Mentor Graphics, is occupied by two topics – connectivity and security. He shares some interesting thoughts and statistics around these gleaned from the event.

Fascinating insights into the world of bio-medicine and computational bio-medicine are provided by Dr Michael J McManus, Intel. He explains how Artificial Intelligence (AI) and High Performance Computing (HPC) are used by researchers to analyze data and predicts an era of revolutionary cancer breakthroughs, of both drug development structures and genome analytics running on a single Intel cluster using Intel Xeon, Intel Xeon Phi processors and Intel Omni-Path architecture.

There is a fascinating collection of rare books at MIT, exhibited to mark Ada Lovelace Day. For those can’t walk the aisles of the MIT Libraries, Stephen Skuce, MIT Libraries, shows us through some of the collection relating to women who have contributed to science, math and engineering with its annual celebration of the history of women in the STEM (Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

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