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Posts Tagged ‘autonomous vehicles’

Blog Review – Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

A review from CES, and looking ahead to 2018; How the IoT will develop in industry and prototyping; Autonomous driving research; the value of HBM

Research commissioned by Arm around the road to autonomous vehicles is detailed in a blog by Andy Moore. He provides a link to a white paper that touches on the state of ADAS today and what the industry is doing to develop robotaxis and autonomous driving.

After a weather and travel round-up, Paul McLellan, Cadence, highlights some of the news from CES 2018. He alights on automotive and the car designed by Dream Chip and Globalfoundries in the company’s suite and highlights from vehicle manufacturers and semiconductor companies. He also takes in a 5G keynote, TVs, augmented reality, holographs, drones, 3D printing and welcomes robots.

There are many ideas for the IoT, and how to prototype them, with dwindling ranks of hardware and software developers, is perplexing Pär Håkansson, Nordic Semiconductor. He proposes a web-based platform to ‘plug the gaps’ and the company’s own Thingy:52 and nRF Cloud to configure IoT prototypes.

For centuries, people have wanted to know what the future holds. Some mystics have attempted to predict what is to come, some with more success than others. IHS Markit limits itself to identifying transformative technologies for this year. The checklist is analysed in a white paper that can be loaded free of charge.

Another soothsayer is Chet Hellum, Intel, who is not exactly sticking his neck when he says the IoT is going to be big in 2018. His blog looks at how the IoT will drive manufacturing trends in 2018 and the benefits investments can bring to a smart factory.

The role of memory in high bandwith graphics, high performance computing and artificial intelligence will present verification challenges. Shaily Khare, Synopsys examines the structure and strengths of High Bandwith Memory (HBM), the enhancements of HBM2 and how to exploit its properties.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, November 6, 2017

Monday, November 6th, 2017

This week, we find that ANSYS gets hyper about Hyperloop development, Xilinx puts its mind to networks, Maxim supports factory automation and NXP, Mentor and ON Semiconductor explain why and how a product can be used.

A positively upbeat tone is set by Maxim Integrated’s Jeff DeAngelis, as he looks at how Industry 4.0 and automation is bringing back jobs. He looks at how being competitive through automation is leading to reshoring activity.

The now infamous ‘Jeep hack’ is the starting point for Timo van Roermund, the security architect at NXP considers what safeguards are needed and how the car domain needs to be re-thought for security on the roads. As well as citing several NXP products, there are also some useful links.

There’s a new look to the Mentor Graphics blogs and Michael Nopp uses it to good effect to take us through the company’s PADS Professional. His use of clear, colourful graphics adds to a simply told design guide.

Who isn’t super-excited about Hyperloop technology at the moment? Adora Anound Tadros, HyperXite guests on the ANSYS site to tell us how the team from University of California, Irvine, used simulation tools for its entry in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod competition. The team is gaining momentum and was in the top six of this year’ competition and is planning to compete again in 2018 – with a self-propulsion pod design.

Smile, you’re on camera, says an image-conscious Jason Liu, ON Semiconductor. He looks at the changing roles of cameras in our lives and introduces the company’s digital image sensor.

Another current favourite topic is neural networks. Steve Leibson proudly relates how a team at the University of Birmingham in the UK has implemented a deep recurrent neural network on a Xilinx Zynq Z-7020 SoC using the Python programming language.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, October 23, 2017

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

This week blogs are focused on health and AI, from remote care for the elderly to asthma inhalers using machine learning; plus sewer cleaning and multimedia SoCs

The autonomous car can reduce hospital visits by visiting patients – but won’t that put more cars on the road? David P Ryan, Intel advocates a delivery service for the next generation of healthcare.

Taking an engineer’s view on every object, Peter Ferguson, Arm, looks at the asthma inhaler and takes a deep breath at the Amiko ‘smart’ inhaler which uses an Arm Cortex-M processor.

Former Cadence employee, Vishal Kapoor, presented Preparing for the Cognitive Era, at San Jose State University. Paul McLellan, Cadence reports on why Kapoor is worried about the amount of data companies are collecting.

The importance of video content, used in augmented reality devices and 4K UHD TV, relies on efficient multimedia SoCs. Richard Pugh, Mentor, looks at some of the ways and means to verify the data and cites an interesting example of a customer developing a drone.

No wonder it’s called Solo – who would want to join RedZone Robotics’ autonomous sewer-inspection robot (called Solo)? Steve Leibson, Xilinx, uncovers the clean workings of the robot that crawls and records where others refuse to go, and explains how it uses Spartan FPGA for image processing and for AI. (There’s a video too – but it’s not a mucky one!)

Enough about the IoT, says Jim Harrison, Lincoln Technology Communications, guest blogging for Maxim Integrated. What about how to connect millions of sensors and actuators? He lays out a comprehensive ‘shopping list’ of long range wireless comms and connection options to help speed up the IoT conversation.

Coming full circle, Marc Horner, ANSYS, relates the case study of computational modeling for insulin delivery systems.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Monday, August 28th, 2017

This week, we find Trust issues for autonomous cars; Something old to wear; How to get design teams to talk; Discover Cadence adds ARM to its library; and Unravelling RTOS with Mentor

Autonomous driving – it’s all a matter of trust, says Jack Weast, Intel. Fearing the robot at the wheel can be overcome, he maintains, reviewing the findings of a Trust Interaction Study. His blog covers human-machine judgement, personal space and lack of assistance, awareness and information balance and giving up control.

Proving there is nothing new under the sun, Maeva Mandard, Dassault Systèmes, considers wearable technology and the earliest example of a wearable calculator. She outlines how an integrated view, mechanics, electronics and embedded software will allow design and test teams to work together.

Adopting a novel approach –i.e. different teams communicating – Lucid Motors designed a luxury electric vehicle by locking different engineering teams in a room. Another significant factor, relates Sandeep Sovani, ANSYS, is the use of multiphysics simulation on the Workbench platform for simultaneous optimisation.

Keeping up with multi-core, SoCs, Steve Brown, Cadence explains how the company’s library of portable stimulus is designed for specific functional sub-systems that are common in complex SoCs. The first, for multi-core ARMv8 and ARMv8.2 architectures, are introduced, with a link to Nick Heaton, ARM’s blog on the library. More libraries are promised for later this year.

Some economic policy advice becomes an analogy for Tom De Schutter, Synopsys, for engineers moving from single FPGA prototypes to multiple FPGA ones. How to make the leap painlessly is an interesting read addressing a topic that many will recognize.

A very informative piece by Colin Walls, Mentor Graphics, continues his RTOS focus, with a blog about data transfer. He provides some clear graphics to show the task of data transfer and opens a window on this procedure.

Blog Review – Monday, July 10, 2017

Monday, July 10th, 2017

This week’s bloggers are kept busy with machine learning (Intel and Synopsys) as well as predicting the future for industry 4.0 (Dassault Systèmes), IoT and 5G (ARM and Hyper) and where Marty McFly went wrong (ANSYS)

As industries gear up to invest four to five per cent of revenues in digitization, Mark Bese, Dassault Systèmes looks at what Industry 4.0 will mean for work process, investment and why early adopters will gain the most.

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a one-wheel skateboard, designed by Kyle Doerksen and much admired by Susan Coleman, ANSYS. She explains how digital prototyping helped get the Onewheel off the ground - while keeping the ride off it.

A practical approach to autonomous vehicles is taken by Puneet Sinha, Mentor Graphics. He looks under-the-hood and provides a comprehensive list of where designers need to focus their attention.

On a learning curve about machine learning, Sean Safarpour, Syopsys, wonders where EDA can assist and positions the company’s VC Formal as the tool for the job.

Not everything in the olden days was better and simulation is a case in point. Xteam at Cadence has written about a new way to reduce simulation test time, as Xcelium Simulator enables multi-core simulation to break the bottleneck and accelerate test times.

Promising new ways to drive the IoT, edge computing and 5G infrastructure, the open source runV project is reviewed by Mark Hambleton, ARM. The Open Containers Iniatitive (OCI)-compliant secure container runtime technology aims to bring security while maintaining performance and portability.

Having a whale of a time, Ted Willke, Intel, heads off to the deep blue yonder to study humpback whales as part of the Parley SnotBot expedition using the SnotBot drone to collect data from the whales’ err, well, snot (or blow). Apparently, it is rich with data from DNA, hormones, to viruses, bacteria, and toxins. (Probably best not to read this blog post over lunch!)

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, June 26, 2017

Monday, June 26th, 2017

This week, hot on the heels of DAC, a review of the Austin event; Intel administers a dose of precision medicine; Challenges for drivers; How to choose between a GPU or FPGA and a blockchain reaction for the IoT

DAC 2017 took place in Austin, Texas, and Paul MeLellan, Cadence Design Systems, was there and has collated a wide-ranging report, with day-by-day news, including bats and bagpipes from the 54 th incarnation of the event.

Writing from a very personal viewpoint, Bryce Olson, Intel, advocates precision medicine, and looks at Intel’s scalable reference architecture to speed up the research and answers in medical care.

Vehicle safety is critical, and Stephen Pateras, Mentor Graphics, looks at self-test and monitoring in autonomous cars, using the Tessent MissionMode architecture. He explains in a clear, detailed manner, the IC test capabilities and simulation for self-driving cars.

Still with vehicle design, Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, flags up the security hazards around the connected car as sensors proliferate and hackers ramp up their assaults. He advocates software security and the communication protection afforded by the IEEE 802.11p protocol.

A handy white paper is brought to our attention by Steve Leibson, Xilinx, for those deciding whether a GPU is better than an FPGA in cloud computing, machine leaning, video and image processing applications.

I learned a couple of things from Christine Young, Maxim Integrated this week. One is that there is a job title of ‘chief IoTologist’, the other was to put the term ‘blockchain’ into context for the IoT. She reports from the IoT World Conference about how blockchain, using advanced cryptography, provides a “tamper-proof distributed record of transactions” and how the IoT Alliance is occupied in developing a shared blockchain protocol as a common identifier to secure IoT products.

Starstruck John Blyler, looks at the reality behind the stardust and conducts an interview with Dr Clifford Johnson, physicist at University of Southern California and script adviser for the National Geographic Channel’s TV program, Genius, about Albert Einstein.

Blog Review – Monday, June 12, 2017

Monday, June 12th, 2017

This week, we find traffic systems for drones and answers to the questions ‘What’s the difference between safe and secure?’ and ‘Can you hear voice control calling?’

An interesting foray into semantics is conducted by Andrew Hopkins, ARM, as he looks at what makes a system secure and what makes a system safe and can the two adjectives be interchanged in terms of SoC design? (With a little plug for ARM at DAC later this month.)

It had to happen, a traffic system designed to restore order to the skies as commercial drones increase in number. Ken Kaplan, Intel, looks at what NASA scientists and technology leaders have come up with to make sense of the skies.

Voice control is ready to bring voice automation to the smart home, says Kjetil Holstad, Nordic Semiconductor. He highlights a fine line of voice-activation’s predecessors and looks to the future with context-awareness.

More word play, this time from Tom De Schutter, Synopsys, who discusses verification and validation and their role in prototyping.

Tackling two big announcements from Mentor Graphics, Mike Santarini, looks at the establishment of the outsourced assembly and test (OSAT) Alliance program, and the company’s Xpedition high-density advanced packaging (HDAP) flow. He educates without patronizing on why the latter in particular is good news for fabless companies and where it fits in the company’s suite of tools. He also manages to flag up technical sessions on the topic at next month’s DAC.

Reporting from IoT DevCon, Christine Young, Maxim Integrated, highlights the theme of security in a connected world. She reviews the presentation “Shifting the IoT Mindset from Security to Trust,” by Bill Diotte, CEO of Mocana, and In “Zero-Touch Device Onboarding for IoT,” by Jennifer Gilburg, director of strategy, Internet of Things Identity at Intel. She explores a lot of the pitfalls and perils with problem-solving.

Anticipating a revolution in transportation, Alyssa, Dassault Systemes, previews this week’s Movin’On in Montreal, Canada, with an interview with colleague and keynote speaker, Guillaume Gerondeau, Senior Director Transportation and Mobility Asia. He looks at how smart mobility will impact cities and how 3D virtual tools can make the changes accessible and acceptable.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, May 22, 2017

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

This week’s collection looks at what’s needed for autonomous cars; Qt tackles flaky tests, Sonics seeks wonderment, and blogs for design advice

Just as drivers choose their cars to meet their needs, so driverless cars need an assortment of processors, argues Intel’s Kathy Winter. She likens the designer’s toolbox to a golf bag with something for every dilemma encountered.

Reporting from the bi-annual GENIVI meeting in Birmingham, England, Andrew Pattersen, Mentor Graphics, learns that big data ownership could be a bone of contention in the next business model for the automotive industry.

Autonomous automotive development requires a thorough understanding of a variety of protocols for automation, electronics control and software. Jaspreet Singh Gambhir, Synopsys, explains how verification offerings can accelerate design.

It is always fun to hear about design mishaps and Sudhir Sharma, ANSYS, entertains with some he has come across to explain why digital twins and physics-based simulation not only meets design objectives but can save costs and boost profitability.

Where’s the wonder?, wonders Randy Smith, Sonics, marveling at why more people were impressed at the Machine Learning Developers Conference as he learned about Wave Computing’s dataflow for deep learning.

Consistency is key for Frederik Gladhorn, Qt, as he investigates a metric infrastructure for what he calls flaky tests, which hamper a design’s progress, with some practical advice and examples.

Speaking directly to anyone struggling with multiple layer design, Parul Agarwal, Cadence Design Systems, has some thoughts and advice on how to use a multi-layer bus. The blog is illustrated with some useful images as a practical guide for anyone struggling with layer patterns.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday, August 29, 2016

Monday, August 29th, 2016

This week’s blogs are futuristic, with machine learning, from Intel, augmented reality from Synopsys, smart city software from Dassault Systèmes, questions and answers about autonomous vehicles, and security issues, around devices and MQTT on the IoT.

Artificial intelligence is the next great wave, predicts Lenny Tran, Intel. His post looks at machine learning and Intel’s High Performance Computing architecture is part of the way forward in machine learning.

On a similar theme, Hezi Saar, Synopsys, examines the Microsoft 28nm SoC and is impressed with the possibilities for augmented reality that the HoloLens Processing Units has for this developing marketplace.

If you are dissatisfied with your present office location, Dassault Systèmes has plans for smart faciliites, reports Akio. He describes some illuminating projects using 3D Experience City, real-time monitoring, the IoT and systems operations for a comfortable workspace in smart cities.

It’s all about teamwork according to Brandon Wade, Aldec, who offers an introduction to the AXI protocol. His post summarizes the protocol specifications and shares his revelation at how understanding the protocol opens up a world of design possibilities.

Autonomous cars are occupying a lot of Eamonn Ahearne’s, ON Semiconductor, time. Living in the hotbed of self-drive test, he reads, visits and analyses what is happening and is disappointed that hardware is being eclipsed by software in the popularity stakes.

Also occupied with autonomous vehicles, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, starts with an update on electric vehicles, and moves onto the disconnect between ADAS technologies and autonomous vehicles and the engineering challenges that can be addressed using a single ECU (Engine Control Unit).

Attending the Linley Mobile & Wearables Conference, Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, pays attention to Asaf Ashkenazi of Cryptography Research (now part of Rambus) and his well-illustrated post reports how devices can be secured.

An IoT network, powered by the ISO/IEC PRF 20922 standard MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport) can be at risk, warns Wilfred Nilsen, ARM. It is a sound warning about personal information being vulnerable to MQTT brokers. Luckily, he offers a solution, introducing the SMQ IoT protocol.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, June 13, 2016

Monday, June 13th, 2016

DAC 2016 highlights; Medical technology and IoT; Autonomous car market races ahead; Remote controlled beer; Secure connectivity

Distinguishing between Big Data and Business Intelligence, ScientistBob, Intel, identifies a ‘watershed’ moment for Big Data and Intel’s steps with Intel Xeon processors to deliver the next step in data analytics.

In response to FCC regulations, the prpl Foundation addresses next-generation security for connected devices. Alexandru Voica, Imagination Techologies, has collected some useful information (demo, white paper, devices, kits and links) to show the progress made.

A fascinating medical application is detailed in Steve Leibso, Xilinx, as he describes how the Xynq-7000 SoC in an eye-tracking computer interface. The video is a little ‘salesy’ and could have benefitted from some more examples of use rather than talking heads but has some practical engineering information about how the processing moves to the SoC.

Continuing the medical theme, Thierry Marchal, ANSYS, tantalizes readers ahead of a medical IoT webinar (June 22) by Cambridge Consultants. He has some interesting statistics to put the topic into context, some graphics and an exploration of the communications protocols involved.

The 53 rd DAC saw ARM launch ARM Artisan physical IP, including POP IP, targeting mainstream mobile designs. Brian Fuller, ARM, adds some meat to the bones with comment from Will Abbey, general manager, ARM’s Physical Design Group.

Automotive design at DAC captured the interest of Christine Young, Cadence, who reports on the keynote by Lars Reger, CTO Automotive Business Unit, NXP Semiconductors. She looks at the security issues for vehicles from the family car to trucks.

Beer that comes to you takes the slog out of summer al fresco dining, doesn’t it? The Atmel team details the use of an ATmefa8 MCU for a remote controlled beer crate, with a link to the build recipe list.

Here in the UK, we are knee-deep in discussions about how to get on with our neighbours as an EU membership referendum looms. A model for happy international relations is here in the blog by Devi Keller, Semiconductor Industry Association, which records the 20 years of the World Semiconductor Council (WSC).

A trip to Detroit for Robert Bates, Mentor Graphics, for its IESF conference, was a source of great material for all things related to autonomous cars. Keynotes and networking led him to consider safety and neural network questions around the technology.

Putting it all into practise, the first Self Racing Cars track event is gleefully reported by Danny Shapiro, Nvidia. There are some great images capturing the spirit of a ground-breaking event. Last weekend a momentous event in the motorsports and automotive world took place. Of course, the company’s technology is used and there is a handy list of what was used and where.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor


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