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Blog Review – Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Monday, September 11th, 2017

We have found ways to tune up the testbench from Cadence; a vision of smart cities from BDTI; the Crotian EV market; and for Mentor and Maxim, it’s competition time!

Introducing the idea of an east European country innovating in automotive design, Alyssa, Dassault Systemes, profiles Rimac Automobili, Croatia, and its Concept_One electric vehicle. The company profile and link with 3DExperience makes an interesting read.

Hoping to change perspectives on testbench practises, the Xteam, Cadence Design Systems, looks into how test time can be reduced for modern SoCs using its Perspec tool.

Trying to put a silver lining on the cloud of the end of the summer, rkasnick, Mentor Graphics, has details of the Digi-Key Electronics Back2School contest (limited to US and Canada students). The offer of free, perpetual license of PADS MakerPro design software is not to be sniffed at, and there are other prizes for young maker engineers.

The news behind the partnership deal with SiFive, to bring embedded analytics to more RISC-V application, are given by Rupert Baines, UltraSoC. More than just a new member of the DesignShare program, could this latest partnership be indicative of a shift happening in the industry for a more democratized design methodology?

It makes sense – time saved at the design stage can translate to more time for interests and hobbies. After a rather clumsy boast about frequent flyer miles nanoMan, Maxim Integrated introduces the EE-Sim Power Designer Challenge. Crossword buffs should give it a go, there’s a chance to win a Garmin fēnix 5 watch.

Clutching his smartphones, Jeff Bier, BDTI, considers embedded vision for smart cities of the future. His ideas for smart cities are not revolutionary, but he concisely identifies the key technologies needed to make computer vision-based systems an opportunity not to be missed.

An insight into what may be in store for 5G is reported on by John Blyler, Chip Design. His report on the Imec Technology Forum Southeast Asia in Singapore, looks at two products developed by imec and the target market of below 60GHz smartphones.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Monday, August 28th, 2017

This week, we find Trust issues for autonomous cars; Something old to wear; How to get design teams to talk; Discover Cadence adds ARM to its library; and Unravelling RTOS with Mentor

Autonomous driving – it’s all a matter of trust, says Jack Weast, Intel. Fearing the robot at the wheel can be overcome, he maintains, reviewing the findings of a Trust Interaction Study. His blog covers human-machine judgement, personal space and lack of assistance, awareness and information balance and giving up control.

Proving there is nothing new under the sun, Maeva Mandard, Dassault Systèmes, considers wearable technology and the earliest example of a wearable calculator. She outlines how an integrated view, mechanics, electronics and embedded software will allow design and test teams to work together.

Adopting a novel approach –i.e. different teams communicating – Lucid Motors designed a luxury electric vehicle by locking different engineering teams in a room. Another significant factor, relates Sandeep Sovani, ANSYS, is the use of multiphysics simulation on the Workbench platform for simultaneous optimisation.

Keeping up with multi-core, SoCs, Steve Brown, Cadence explains how the company’s library of portable stimulus is designed for specific functional sub-systems that are common in complex SoCs. The first, for multi-core ARMv8 and ARMv8.2 architectures, are introduced, with a link to Nick Heaton, ARM’s blog on the library. More libraries are promised for later this year.

Some economic policy advice becomes an analogy for Tom De Schutter, Synopsys, for engineers moving from single FPGA prototypes to multiple FPGA ones. How to make the leap painlessly is an interesting read addressing a topic that many will recognize.

A very informative piece by Colin Walls, Mentor Graphics, continues his RTOS focus, with a blog about data transfer. He provides some clear graphics to show the task of data transfer and opens a window on this procedure.

Blog Review – Monday, July 10, 2017

Monday, July 10th, 2017

This week’s bloggers are kept busy with machine learning (Intel and Synopsys) as well as predicting the future for industry 4.0 (Dassault Systèmes), IoT and 5G (ARM and Hyper) and where Marty McFly went wrong (ANSYS)

As industries gear up to invest four to five per cent of revenues in digitization, Mark Bese, Dassault Systèmes looks at what Industry 4.0 will mean for work process, investment and why early adopters will gain the most.

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a one-wheel skateboard, designed by Kyle Doerksen and much admired by Susan Coleman, ANSYS. She explains how digital prototyping helped get the Onewheel off the ground - while keeping the ride off it.

A practical approach to autonomous vehicles is taken by Puneet Sinha, Mentor Graphics. He looks under-the-hood and provides a comprehensive list of where designers need to focus their attention.

On a learning curve about machine learning, Sean Safarpour, Syopsys, wonders where EDA can assist and positions the company’s VC Formal as the tool for the job.

Not everything in the olden days was better and simulation is a case in point. Xteam at Cadence has written about a new way to reduce simulation test time, as Xcelium Simulator enables multi-core simulation to break the bottleneck and accelerate test times.

Promising new ways to drive the IoT, edge computing and 5G infrastructure, the open source runV project is reviewed by Mark Hambleton, ARM. The Open Containers Iniatitive (OCI)-compliant secure container runtime technology aims to bring security while maintaining performance and portability.

Having a whale of a time, Ted Willke, Intel, heads off to the deep blue yonder to study humpback whales as part of the Parley SnotBot expedition using the SnotBot drone to collect data from the whales’ err, well, snot (or blow). Apparently, it is rich with data from DNA, hormones, to viruses, bacteria, and toxins. (Probably best not to read this blog post over lunch!)

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, June 26, 2017

Monday, June 26th, 2017

This week, hot on the heels of DAC, a review of the Austin event; Intel administers a dose of precision medicine; Challenges for drivers; How to choose between a GPU or FPGA and a blockchain reaction for the IoT

DAC 2017 took place in Austin, Texas, and Paul MeLellan, Cadence Design Systems, was there and has collated a wide-ranging report, with day-by-day news, including bats and bagpipes from the 54 th incarnation of the event.

Writing from a very personal viewpoint, Bryce Olson, Intel, advocates precision medicine, and looks at Intel’s scalable reference architecture to speed up the research and answers in medical care.

Vehicle safety is critical, and Stephen Pateras, Mentor Graphics, looks at self-test and monitoring in autonomous cars, using the Tessent MissionMode architecture. He explains in a clear, detailed manner, the IC test capabilities and simulation for self-driving cars.

Still with vehicle design, Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, flags up the security hazards around the connected car as sensors proliferate and hackers ramp up their assaults. He advocates software security and the communication protection afforded by the IEEE 802.11p protocol.

A handy white paper is brought to our attention by Steve Leibson, Xilinx, for those deciding whether a GPU is better than an FPGA in cloud computing, machine leaning, video and image processing applications.

I learned a couple of things from Christine Young, Maxim Integrated this week. One is that there is a job title of ‘chief IoTologist’, the other was to put the term ‘blockchain’ into context for the IoT. She reports from the IoT World Conference about how blockchain, using advanced cryptography, provides a “tamper-proof distributed record of transactions” and how the IoT Alliance is occupied in developing a shared blockchain protocol as a common identifier to secure IoT products.

Starstruck John Blyler, looks at the reality behind the stardust and conducts an interview with Dr Clifford Johnson, physicist at University of Southern California and script adviser for the National Geographic Channel’s TV program, Genius, about Albert Einstein.

Blog Review – Monday, May 22, 2017

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

This week’s collection looks at what’s needed for autonomous cars; Qt tackles flaky tests, Sonics seeks wonderment, and blogs for design advice

Just as drivers choose their cars to meet their needs, so driverless cars need an assortment of processors, argues Intel’s Kathy Winter. She likens the designer’s toolbox to a golf bag with something for every dilemma encountered.

Reporting from the bi-annual GENIVI meeting in Birmingham, England, Andrew Pattersen, Mentor Graphics, learns that big data ownership could be a bone of contention in the next business model for the automotive industry.

Autonomous automotive development requires a thorough understanding of a variety of protocols for automation, electronics control and software. Jaspreet Singh Gambhir, Synopsys, explains how verification offerings can accelerate design.

It is always fun to hear about design mishaps and Sudhir Sharma, ANSYS, entertains with some he has come across to explain why digital twins and physics-based simulation not only meets design objectives but can save costs and boost profitability.

Where’s the wonder?, wonders Randy Smith, Sonics, marveling at why more people were impressed at the Machine Learning Developers Conference as he learned about Wave Computing’s dataflow for deep learning.

Consistency is key for Frederik Gladhorn, Qt, as he investigates a metric infrastructure for what he calls flaky tests, which hamper a design’s progress, with some practical advice and examples.

Speaking directly to anyone struggling with multiple layer design, Parul Agarwal, Cadence Design Systems, has some thoughts and advice on how to use a multi-layer bus. The blog is illustrated with some useful images as a practical guide for anyone struggling with layer patterns.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, April 24, 2017

Monday, April 24th, 2017

This week’s blogs are concerned with AI and intelligent, connected vehicles, sometimes both. There are quests to find the facts behind myths and searches for answers for power management and software security too.

Is an effective tool for verification, the stuff of legends? Gabe Moretti, Chip Design Magazine, seeks the truth behind Pegasus – no, not the winged horse, the more earthly verification engine from Cadence.

A power strategy is one thing, but a free trial adds a new dimension to energy management. Don Dingee, Sonics, elaborates on the company’s plan to bring power to the masses, using hardware IP and ICE-Grain Power architecture.

If you are unsure about USB, Senad Lomigora, ON Semiconductor’s blog should help. It looks at what it’s for, why we can’t get enough of USB Type C, USB 3.1, connectors and re-drivers.

Every vehicle’s ADAS relies on good visuals, observes Jim Harrison, guest blogger, Maxim Integrated, and good connectivity. He looks at the securely connected autonomous car, and then homes in on explained how Maxim Integrated exploits GMSL, an alternative to Ethernet, in its MAX96707 and MAX96708 chips, to create an effective in-car communication network.

Still with the connected car, Pete Decher, Mentor Graphics, is fresh from the Autotech Council meeting in San Jose. The company’s DRS360 Autonomous Driving Platform launch was high on the list of discussion topics, along with the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of driving.

Still with AI, Evens Pan, ARM provides an in-depth blog on Chinese start-up, Peceptin’s enabled embedded deep learning. The case study is fascinating and well reported in this comprehensive essay.

Making any software engineer feel insecure about software security is an everyday occurrence, helping them out is a little more out-of-the-ordinary, so if it refreshing to see a post from the editorial team, Synopsys, letting the put-upon software engineer know there is a webinar coming soon (May 2) to enlighten them on the Building Security In Maturity Model (BSIMM), with a link to register to attend.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 27, 2017

Monday, March 27th, 2017

How AI can be used for medical breakthroughs; What’s wired and what’s not; A new compiler from ARM targets functional safety; Industry 4.0 update

A personal history lesson from Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, as he charts the evolution from the beginning of the company, via the author’s career and various milestones with different companies and the trials of DAC over the decades.

Post Embedded World, ARM announced the ARM Compiler 6. Tony Smith, ARM, looks at its role for functional safety and autonomous vehicles.

A review of industrial IoT at Embedded World 2017 is the focus for Andrew Patterson’s blog. Mentor Graphics had several demonstrations for Industry 4.0. He explains the nature of Industry 4.0 and where it is going, the role of OPC-UA (Open Platform Communication – Unified Architecture) and support from Mentor.

What’s wired and what’s wireless, asks David Andeen, Maxim Integrated. His blog looks at vehicle sub-systems and wired communications standards, building automation and wired interface design and a link to an informative tutorial.

There are few philosophical questions posed in the blogs that I review, but this week throws up an interesting one from Philippe Laufer, Dassault Systemes. The quandary is does science drive design, or does design drive science? Topically posted ahead of the Age of Experience event in Milan next month, the answer relies on size and data storage, influenced by both design and science.

Security issues for medical devices are considered by David West, Icon Labs. He looks at the threats and security requirements that engineers must consider.

A worthy competition is announced on the Intel blog – the Artificial Intelligence Kaggle competition to combat cervical cancer. Focused on screening, the competition with MobileODT, using its optical diagnostic devices and software, challenges Kagglers to develop an algorithm that classifies a cervix type, for referrals for treatment. The first prize is $50,000 and there is a $20,000 prize for best Intel tools usage. “We aim to challenge developers, data scientists and students to develop AI algorithms to help solve real-world challenges in industries including medical and health care,” said Doug Fisher, senior vice president and general manager of the Software and Services Group at Intel.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 27, 2017

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Intel and the IoT at Mobile World Congress; Hardware rally cry; Space race; UVM update; Keepng track of heritage with archaeological tools

It’s Mobile World Congress this week, in Barcelona, Spain (February 27 to March 2). Alison Challman, Intel, rounds up some of the IoT highlights at the show, encompassing automated driving, the smart city and smart and connected homes.

Putting some pep into hardware design, Dave Pursley, Cadence, advocates hardware designers adopt a higher level of abstraction and then synthesizing to RTL implementations via high-level synthesis to get happy.

Lamenting the slow pace of space electronics technology compared with commercial products, Ross Bannatyne, Vorago Technologies, reports on the company’s ARM Cortex-M0 MCU in the SpaceX Falcon 9, which headed for the International Space Station.

Reflecting on the development of UVM1.2, Tom Fitzpatrick, Mentor Graphics, charts the progress of the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) and how the to tackle compatibility with earlier versions. More can be discussed at this week’s DVCon US at the company’s booth.

Exploring Android, using Qt tools is the topic explored by Laszlo Agocs, Qt, with example of how to develop Android TV Vulkan content. His blog is a guide to building a qtbase for Android, targeting the 64-bit architecture of the Tegra X1-based NVIDIA Shield TV, using QtGui, QtQuick modules.

Digital preservation captures physical, important sites, which may be at risk, or lost completely, through earthquakes, floods, the passage of time and human threats. Alyssa, Dassault Systemes, has found some examples by CyArk that is preserving sites and how virtual reality headsets can make the sites accessible.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 13, 2017

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Among this week’s topics: two important announcements: the OpenFog Consortium and IEEE Standard for the Functional Verification Language e; a panel discusses the Internet and beyond; Mentor Graphics applies IoT to PCB design; FASTR accelerates the connected car and why USB is not as easy as 123

The importance of IP blocks is a given, but Rocke Acree, ON Semiconductor, explains how selection also has to consider technology and support tools. The company has collaborated with Hexius Semiconductor to qualify analog IP blocks to reduce design cycles and development time.

There are specific constraints, challenges and design requirements for PCBs designed for the burgeoning IoT market. John McMillan, Mentor Graphics has created a two-part blog focused on this topic.

Doing a quickstep around the topic of USB, Eric Huang, Synopsys, explores verification and FPGA prototyping for best results. He recommends some design rules, a test site, then curiously, throws in some political comment, a film review and dance-related jokes to end the blog.

It may not be an understatement by Rhonda Dirvin, ARM, to say that the day the OpenFog Consortium announced its reference architecture is the day we have all been waiting for. Hyperbole? Possibly not, as it defines how secure, interoperable products should be built – just what the connected world needs. She helpfully includes a link to the architecture, and a heads-up on a presentation at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain (Feb 27 to March 3).

If there is an award for Most Apt Acronym, the Future of Automotive Security Technology Research (FASTR) consortium, must be a contender. The uncredited Rambus blog reviews the brief history of the consortium, and discusses its recent manifesto, looking at why it is need for a secure, connected vehicle industry.

2017 begins with the publication of IEEE Std 1647 2016, the IEEE Standard for the Functional Verification Language e. of 2017. Efrat Shneydor, Cadence Design, looks at the enhancements which have been made and proficiently summarizes the highlights.

Generic connectivity is not enough – NASA has been designing, building and launching satellite systems with the goal of providing connectivity throughout the world. The concept and realities of the Internet of Space is the panel discussion topic, reported by John Blyler, Chip Design Magazine.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, January 23, 2017

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

This week’s blogs show the human face of automated driving; and why energy should be taken seriously. There is lift-off for SpaceX to bring more satellite comms and a poetic turn, in the style of Rudyar Kipling’s classic poem.

There is a human element to automated driving, namely Human Machine Interface (HMI) and Jack Weast, Intel, uses his second blog post to examine how and why it can be used. He promises more in part three into the company’s research.

Energy is a serious business, says Grant Pierce, Sonics, and the electronics industry must shoulder some responsibility for power savings. The company, with Semico Research is conducting a survey and wants your help into understanding today’s and tomorrow’s power requirements.

Boosting the satellites to provide point-to-point communications, the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket put the first 10 Iridium NEXT satellites into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), equipped with Xilinx space-grade Virtex-5QV FPGAs to implement the satellites’ On Board Processor (OBP) hardware. Steve Liebson, Xilinx, includes a link to a video describing the constellation and the launch.

Celebrating the relationship with Ericsson, Dassault Systèmes’ Olivier Ribet, looks at how the latter’s Networked Society will transform the way we interact with the world around us and meet technology challenges, such as 5G, IoT and the cloud.

Moving to 10nm and lower process geometries pushes the boundaries of FinFET and the custom layout flow and this means trouble ahead, warns Graham Etchells.

A touch of culture, with a poem “wot I wrote” by Keith Hanna, Mentor Graphics. He deftly tackles Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as Rudyard Kipling might.

Image data and the mysteries of how to create, access and use a Qimage to greatest effect is detailed by Laszlo Agocs, Qt, with three case studies to illustrate what can be done.

A sharp video addressing the interconnect verification challenges is hosted by Nimrod Reiss. Cadence’s Corrie Callenbach has found and highlighted the video.

Caroline Hayes, senior editor

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