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Blog Review – Monday May 18, 2015

Monday, May 18th, 2015

Zynq detects pedestrians; ARMv8-A explained; Product development demands test; Driving connectivity; Celebrating Constellations; Chip challenges

The helpful Michael Thomas, ARM, advises readers that there is The Cortex-A Series Programmer’s Guide for ARMv8-A available and introduces what is in the guide for a taster of the architecture’s features.

The Embedded Vision Summit gives many bloggers material for posts. The first is Steve Leibson, Xilinx, who includes a video Mathworks presented there, with a description if a real-time pedestrian detector running on a Zynq-based workflow, using MathWorks’ Sumulink and HDL Coder.

Another attendee was Brian Fuller, Cadence, who took away the secrets to successful product development, which he sums up as: test, test, test. (He does elaborate beyond that in his detailed blog, reviewing Mike Alrdred of Dyson’s keynote.

Anticipating another event, DAC, Ravi Ravikumar, Ansys, looks at the connected car and the role of design in intelligent vehicles.

Also with an eye on DAC, Rupert Baines, UltraSoC has a guest blog at IP-Extreme, and praises the Constellations initiative, with some solid support – and some restrained back-slapping.

Continuing a verification series, Harry Foster, Mentor, looks at the FPGA space and reflects on how the industry makes choices in formal technology.

A guest blog, at Chip Design, by Dr. Bruce McGaughy, ProPlus Design Solutions, looks at what innovative chip designs mean for chip designers. His admiration for the changing pace of design is balanced with identifying the drivers for low power design to meet the IoT portable phase.

Why do we need HDCP 2.2 and what do we need to do to ensure cryptography and security? These are addressed, and answered, by VIP Experts, Synopsys, in this informative blog.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday April 20, 2015

Monday, April 20th, 2015

Half a century and still quoted as relevant is more than most of us could hope to achieve, so the 50 anniversary of Gordon Moore’s pronouncement which we call Moore’s Law is celebrated by Gaurav Jalan, as he reviews the observation first pronounced on April 19, 1965, which he credits with the birth of the EDA industry, and the fabless ecosystem amongst other things.

Another celebrant is Axel Scherer, Cadence, who reflects on not just shrinking silicon size but the speed of the passing of time.

On the same theme of what Moore’s Law means today for FinFets and nano-wire logic libraries, Navraj Nandra, Synopsys, also commemorates the anniversary, with an example of what the CAD team has been doing with quantum effects at lower nodes.

At NAB (National Broadcasters Association) 2015, in Las Vegas, Steve Leibson, Xilinx, had an ‘eye-opening’ experience at the CoreEL Technologies booth, where the company’s FPGA evaluation kits were the subject of some large screen demos.

Reminiscing about the introduction of the HSA Foundation, Alexandru Voica, Imagination Technologies, provides an update on why heterogeneous computing is one step closer now.

Dr. Martin Scott, the senior VP and GM of Rambus’ Cryptography Research Division, recently participated in a Silicon Summit Internet of Things (IoT) panel hosted by the Global Semiconductor Alliance (GSA). In this blog he discusses the security of the IoT and opportunities for good and its vulnerabilities.

An informative blog by Paul Black, ARM examines the ARM architecture and DS-5 v5.21 DSTREAM support for debug, discussing power in the core domain and how to manage it for effective debug and design.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday April 06, 2015

Monday, April 6th, 2015

It’s always tricky looking at blogs on April 1 st. So much technology, so many gags. I didn’t fall for Microsoft UK’s April Fool that Bing can read nerve pulses and brain waves to improve your web search, or HTC’s Rok the Sok, a smart tag which pairs socks in the wash and alerts the wearer when the sock is wearing thin. Many people downloaded Microsoft’s MS-DOS for Windows phones, and loved the joke. The most ‘successful’ or most reported, was CERN’s claim to have found The Force and that it was using it, Star Wars-style to reheat coffee in a mug and return books to a bookshelf while remaining seated. I won’t be at GSA Silicon Summit to get a chance to check McKenzie Mortensen’s claim that IPextreme’s Warren Savage has cut his long hair into a Silicon Valley ‘short back and sides’ – could it another April Fool?

I decided to narrow down my Blog Review search to genuine ones only (I hope!)

Three boards and three ways to write code are discussed by Thomas Aubin, Atmel, interviewed by David Blaza, ARM, ahead of the ARM Embedded Computing Board resource guide.

The pressure to be smart is examined by Matthew Hall, Dassault Systemes. He has latched on to the findings of the Aberdeen Group, that engineering groups must communicate and collaborate to predict system behavior ahead of testing.

Laman Sahoo, Arrow Devices, identifies three sources of confusion for Object Oriented Programming, to take the ‘oops!’ out of OOP.

The reports of the death or slowing down of Moore’s Law are exaggerated, concludes Brian Fuller, in his interview with Suk Lee, Senior Director, Design Infrastructure Marketing division, Cadence, ahead of the TSMC Technology Symposium. In conversation, Fuller pushes Lee on the progress of process development down to 7nm as well as FinFET development.

Ahead of the Embedded Vision Conference, Jeff Bier, BerkeIey Design Technology, looks at how academia and industry respond to neural networks.

3D printable heatsinks are examined by Robin Bornoff, Mentor Graphics, using FloTHERM, and FloMCAD.

Larry Lapides, VP of sales at Imperas, discusses security on connected devices using MIPS CPUs.

A biblical theme is adopted for an Eastertime post by Ramesh Dewangan, Real Intent. The David and Goliath struggle of large and small EDA companies is reported from the Confluence 2015, where one panel was ‘The paradox of leadership: Incremental approach to Big Ideas’, and ‘How to build the technology organisations of tomorrow’.

An interesting smartphone app by Philips to control lighting via WiFi is explored by Ashish D, Intel, but using an Intel Edison board.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 23, 2015

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

Warren Savage, IPextreme, has some sage, timely advice that applies to crossword solving, meeting scheduling and work flows.

At the recent Open Power Summit, Convey Computer announced the Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface (CAPI) development kit based on its Eagle PCIe coprocessor board. Steve Liebson, Xilinx, has a vested interest is telling more, as the accelerator is based on the Xilinx Virtex-7 980T FPGA.

Gloomy predictions from Zvi Or-Bach, MonolithIC 3D, who puts a line in the sand at the 28nm node as smartphone and tablet growth slows.

Saying you can see unicorns is not advisable in commerce, but Ramesh Dewangan, Real Intent has spotted some at Confluence 2015, but where, he wonders, are those for the EDA industry?

ARM’s use of Cadence’s Innovus Implementation System software to design the ARM Cortex-A72 is discussed by Richard Goering, Cadence. As well as the collaboration, the virtues of ARM’s ‘highest performance and most advanced processor’ are highlighted.

ARM has partnered with the BBC, reveals Gary Atkinson, ARM, in the Make it Digital initiative by the broadcasting corporation. One element of the campaign is the Microbit project, in which every child in school year 7 (11-12 years old) will be given a small ARM-based development board that they can program using a choice of software editor. Teachers will be trained and there will be a suite of training materials and tutorials for every child to program their first IoT device.

Mentor Graphics is celebrating a win at the first annual LEDs Magazine Sapphire Award in the category of SSL Tools and Test. Nazita Saye, Mentor Graphics, is in Hollywood Report mode and reviews the awards.

Responding to feedback from readers, Satyapriya Acharya, Syopsys, posts a very interesting blog about verifiying the AMBA system level environment. It is well thought out and informative, with the promise of more capabilities needed in a system monitor to perform checks.

Blog Review – Monday, February 16, 2015

Monday, February 16th, 2015

Repeating last year’s project, Gagan Luthra, ARM, explains this year’s 100 projects in 100 days for the new Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) Pioneer Kit, with Cypress’s PsoC 4 BLE; an ARM Cortex-M0 CPU with BLE radio.

Steve Schulz visited Cadence Design and entranced Brian Fuller, with his ideas for standards for the IoT, the evolution of the SoC into a System on Stack and the design gaps that lie en route.

Fighting the Nucleus corner, Chris Ciufo, ee catalog, rejoices in the news that Mentor Graphics is repositioning the RTOS for Industrie 4.0, for factory automation, and standing up to the tough guys in the EDA playground.

Following the news that Intel is to buy Lantiq, Martin Bijman, Chipworks, looks into what the acquisition will bring to the Intel stable, presenting some interesting statistics.

Maybe a little one-sided, but the video presented by Bernie DeLay, Synopsys, is informative about how VIP architecture accelerates memory debug for simultaneous visualization.

The normally relaxed and affable Warren Savage, IP-extreme is getting hot under the collar at the thought of others ‘borrowing’, or plain old plagiarism, as he puts it in his post. The origins of the material will be argued, (the offending article has been removed from the publication’s site), but Savage uses the incident to make a distinction between articles with a back story and ‘traditional’ tech journalism.

To end on a light note, Raj Suri, Intel, presents a list compiled by colleagues of employees that look like celebrities. Nicholas Cage, Dame Helen Mirren and Michael J Fox doppelgangers are exposed.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 09, 2015

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Arthur C Clarke interview; Mastering Zynq; The HAPS and the HAPS-nots; Love thy customer; What designers want; The butterfly effect for debug

A nostalgic look by at an AT&T and MIT conference, by Artie Beavis, ARM, has a great video interview with Arthur C Clarke. It is fascinating to see the man himself envisage mobile connectivity and ‘devices that send information to friends, the exchange of pictorial information and data; the ‘completely mobile’ telephone as well as looking forward to receiving signals from outer space.

A video tutorial presented by Dr Mohammad S Sadri, Microelectronic Systems Design Research Group at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany, shows viewers how to create AXI-based peripherals in the Xilinx Zynq SoC programmable logic. Steve Liebson, Xilinx posts the video. Dr Sadri may appear a little awkward with the camera rolling, but he clearly knows his stuff and the 23 minute video is informative.

Showing a little location envy, Michael Posner, Synopsys, visited his Californian counterparts, and inbetween checking out gym and cafeteria facilities, he caught up on FPGA-based prototype debug and HAPS.

Good news from the Semiconductor Industry Association as Falan Yinug reports on record-breaking sales in 2014 and quarterly growth. Who bought what makes interesting – and reassuring – reading.

Although hit with the love bug, McKenzie Mortensen, IPextreme, does not let her heart rule her head when it comes to customer relations. She presents the company’s good (customer) relationship guide in this blog.

A teaser of survey results from Neha Mittal, Arrow Devices, shows what design and verification engineers want. Although the survey is open to more respondents until February 15, the results received so far are a mix of predictable and some surprises, all with the option to see disaggregated, or specific, responses for each questions.

From bugs to butterflies, Doug Koslow, Cadence, considers the butterfly effect in verification and presents some sound information and graphics to show the benefits of the company’s SimVision.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday February 2, 2015

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

2015’s must-have – a personal robot, Thumbs up for IP access, USB 3.1 has landed, Transaction recap, New talent required, Structuring medical devices, MEMS sensors webinar

Re-living a youth spent watching TV cartoons, Brad Nemire, ARM, marvels at the Personal Robot created by Robotbase. It uses an ARM-based board powered by a Quad-core Qualcomm Krait CPU, so he interviewed the creator, Duy Huynh, Founder and CEO of Robotbase and found out more about how it was conceived and executed. I think I can guess what’s on Nemire’s Christmas list already.

Getting a handle on security access to big data, Michael Ford, Mentor Graphics, suggests a solution to accessing technology IP or patented technology without resorting to extreme measures shown in films and TV.

Celebrating the integration of USB 3.1 in the Nokia N1 tablet and other, upcoming products, Eric Huang, Synopsys, ties this news in with access to “the best USB 3.1 webinar in the universe”, which – no great surprise – is hosted by Synopsys. He also throws in some terrible jokes – a blog with something for everyone.

A recap on transaction-based verification is provided by Axel Scherer, Cadence, with the inevitable conclusion that the company’s tools meet the task. The blog’s embedded video is simple, concise and informative and worth a click.

Worried about the lack of new, young engineers entering the semiconductor industry, Kands Manickam, IP extreme, questions the root causes for the stagnation.

A custom ASIC and ASSP microcontroller combine to create the Struix product, and Jakob Nielsen, ON Semiconductor, explains how this structure can meet medical and healthcare design parameters with a specific sensor interface.

What’s the IoT without MEMS sensors? Tim Menasveta, ARM, shows the way to an informative webinar : Addressing Smart Sensor Design Challenges for SoCs and IoT, hosted in collaboration with Cadence, using its Virtuoso and MEMS Convertor tools and the Cortex-M processors.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, January 26 2015

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Finding fault tolerances with Cortex-R5; nanotechnology thinks big; Cadence, – always talking; mine’s an IEEE on ice; IP modeling

The inherent fault tolerance ARM’s Cortex-R5 processors is explored and expanded upon by Neil Werdmuller, ARM, in an informative blog. Reading this post, it is evident that it is as much about the tools and ecosystem as the processor technology.

Nanotechnology is a big subject, and Catherine Bolgar, Dassault Systemes, tackles this overview competently, with several, relevant links in the post itself.

Harking back to CES, Brian Fuller, Cadence, shares an interesting video from the show, where Ty Kingsmore, Realtek Semiconductor, talks the talk about always on voice applications and the power cost.

A special nod has to be given to Arthur Marris, Cadence, who travelled to Atlanta for the IEEE 802.3 meeting but managed to sightsee and includes a photo in his post of the vault that holds the recipe for coca cola. He also hints at the ‘secret formula’ for the 2.5 and 5G PHY and automotive proposals for the standard. (Another picture shows delegates’ tables but there were no iconic bottles to be seen anywhere – missed marketing opportunity?)

In conversation with leading figures in the world of EDA, Gabe Moretti, considers the different approaches to IP modeling in today’s SoC designs.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor.

Blog Review – Monday, January 19 2015

Monday, January 19th, 2015

Test case for lazybones; Mongoose in space, heads for Pluto; solar tracker design; new age shopping; IoT insight – the real challenge

The size of SoCs, security around EDA tools and the effort needed to test tool issues are all hurdles that can be mounted, asserts Uwe Simm, Cadence. His comprehensive post explains how the Test Case Optimizer (TCO) – a small generic (as in no special tools required or design styles are required) – can strip down simulation source files and reduce overal source input data size by over 99%.

After a stellar break, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft reached Pluto. Not only does it have the ashes of astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, the discoverer of Pluto, it has a Mongoose on board – in the form of a MIPS-based Mongoose-V chip. Alexandru Voica, Imagination, tells us more about the rad-hard device manufactured by Synova.

An interesting project, and a worthy one too, is relayed in the blog post by John McMillan (Mentor Graphics). Cool Earth Solar designs and develops solar products and uses PADS to develop some of the monitoring hardware for the equipment that tracks the sun, and transmits data for the project.

A subject close to my heart, shopping, is explored by David McKinney, Intel, who has a guest blog from Jon Bird, Y&R Labstore. How to harness the data that make up shopping patterns, without freaking out shoppers. A startling obvious observation is “Retailers must first and foremost be shopper-centric” but what does that mean in the digital age and the Internet of Things era?

Demonstrating a helpful nature, David Blaza, ARM, points us to a report by McKinsey, about the Internet of Things. As well as Blaza’s observation relating to ARM’s Cortex-M devices on the edge of the IoT and ARM Cortex-A at the hub and gateway level, I was struck by Joep Van Beurden’s observation that the IoT is not about prices or power but connecting the hardware in a smart way to the cloud.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, January 12, 2015

Monday, January 12th, 2015

New year resolutions from ARM, IP Extreme; CES highlights from Cadence, Synopsys, ARM partners; Mentor looks back at 2014; Imagination looks ahead

It wouldn’t be a January Blog Review without a mention of resolutions. Jacob Beningo, ARM, is disappointed that DeLoreans and hover boards are not filling the skies as predicted in Back to the Future, but he does believe that 2015 should be the year of sound, embedded software development resolutions.

A challenge is thrown down by McKenzie, IP Extreme, to ensure the company meets its new year resolution to update its blog. If you find that the company has missed posting a blog by midnight Wednesday (Pacific time) you can claim a $100 voucher for a chop or restaurant of your choice.

It wouldn’t be the week after CES, if there were no mentions of ‘that show’. Michael Posner, Synopsys, looked beneath the cars, entertainment devices and robots to focus on sensors (and to mention DesignWare Sensor and Control Subsystem, which designs them).

Brian Fuller, Cadence, interviews Martin Lund, senior vice president for Cadence’s IP Group, at CES. Lund has some interesting observations about audio and video demos at the show and insight into the role of IP.

ARM was everywhere at CES, and Brad Nemire, ARM, has some great videos on his blog, with demos of partners’ devices, and also a link to a Bloomberg interview with CEO Simon Segars.

International finance was not covered at CES, but the mobile money payment services described in the blog by Catherine Bolgar, Dassault Systemes has a lot of ‘CES criteria’, connectivity, innovation and commercial applications, as well as the Vegas connection with cash. It is an enlightening view of how technology can help those without deemed to expensive to reach and service by conventional banking institutions.

Looking back at 2014, Vern Wnek, Mentor, considers the overall winner of the longest running EDA awards, the Technology Leadership Awards, Alcatel-Lucent. The award winnning project was the 1X100GE packet module includes 100Gb/s of total processing power and signals operating at 6/12/28GHz.

A world without wired cables, is the vision of Alexandru Voica, Imagination, who checks just how close a cable-free life is; encouraged with some introductions from the company, of course.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor.

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