Part of the  

Chip Design Magazine

  Network

About  |  Contact

Posts Tagged ‘Mentor Graphics’

Next Page »

Blog Review – Monday, April 25 2016

Monday, April 25th, 2016

System validation partnership; Cloud’s blue sky thinking; Happy 50 th optic fiber; Back to PCIe basics; Pointing the fingerprint; Financial forecast

Retracing his steps, Richard Solomon, Synopsys, looks at the progress of PCI Express, and more specifically, how to handle the bandwidth increases. This blog details some solid principles and extends an offer of help for developers.

Fresh from rubbing shoulders with attendees of the SAE World Congress automotive industry technical conference and tradeshow, Pete Decher, Mentor Graphics, clearly has his eye on the latest Tesla model and its plans for autonomous driving. He reviews reactions to V2X (Vehicle to Infrastructure & Vehicle to Vehicle) and ECU (Electronic Control Unit) Consolidation.

Another review is delivered by Steve Brown, Cadence Design Systems, who attended the Optical Fiber Conference. He manages to celebrate the 50 th anniversary of fiber optic communications technology and looks at how it started and where it’s going.

Poring over financials is not everyone’s idea of fun, but Chris Ciufo, eecatalog, takes one for the team and compiled this blog about the economical outlook for the technology industry. He considers the role of the IoT, autonomous vehicles and their role on productivity.

Best practice for cloud computing is set out in the blog from Wim Slagter, ANSYS. He elaborates on eight Dos and Don’ts for High Performance Computing (HPC) and cloud computing to maximize it for engineering simulation.

Identifying the bottleneck of functional validation in SoC design, Eoin McCann, ARM, examines some of the IP tools the company offers to its ecodesign partners

New tools reduce the risk of IP reuse, believes Warren Savage, IP Extreme. He sets out a clear case for fingerprinting IP, a brief checklist and explains how Chip DNA Analysis software can be used in SoC design.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday April 11 2016

Monday, April 11th, 2016

Mbed development board seeks therapy; in praise of HPC; IoT security – can it be improved?; EDAC name change; acquisition fever runs high

Checking and testing safety critical systems can be performed using the Zynq-7000 All Programmable SoC (AP SoC) with dual ARM Cortex-A9 processors, and dual Neon FPUs. Austin, Xilinx, explains the routine.

Therapy from an mbed development board may not threat therapists just yet, but ELIZA, the computer program that simulates a psychotherapist, is now available for the mbed platform. The obvious question to ask Wilfred Nilsen, ARM, is “How do you feel about that?”

Who needs High Performance Computing (HPC), asks Wim Slagter, Ansys. He addresses computing as a strategic asset, scalability benefits and what to do with a server cluster.

The Internet of Things (IoT) security market will be worth $28.90 billion by 2020, yet it is flawed, argues an unattributed blog from Rambus. Interviews with Simon Blake-Wilson and Ted Harrington, Rambus, assess how much ground needs to be made up.

Still with security, Robert Vamosi, Synopsys reports on the Synopsys and Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) collaboration to create the UL Cybersecurity Assurance Program (UL CAP). The aim is to increase transparency and confidence in the security of network-connectable devices using expertise from both camps.

Looking ahead to the connected car, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, considers what will be coming together for a centralized processing system, handling communications and autonomous driving functions. The vehicle’s systems will be consolidated, but how best to achieve that is up for debate.

It may take some people a while to adjust, but the EDA Consortium has changed its name to the Electronic System Design Alliance. Gabe Moretti, Chip Design Magazine, looks at the whys and wherefores behind the change and the expertly analyses the Alliance’s expanded charter.

Intel has bought Yogitech, the functional safety company and Ken Caviasca, Intel, looks at what this means for the company and, in particular, its IoT offering.

Still with acquisitions, it is all getting a bit too much for Chris Ciufo, eecatalog, who traces some recent ‘musical chairs’ before focusing on what the Mercury Computer purchase of three Microsemi businesses will meet for the military market.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 21 2016

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Coffee breaks and C layers; Ideas for IoT security; Weather protection technology; Productivity boost; Shining a light on dark silicon

Empathizing with his audience, Jacek Majkowski, sees the need for coffee but not necessarily a C layer in Standard Co-Emulation Modelling Interface (SCE-MI).

At last week’s Bluetooth World, in Santa Clara, CA, there was a panel discussion – Is the IoT hype or hope? Brian Fuller, ARM, reports on the to-and-fro of ideas from experts from ARM, Google, and moderated by Mark Powell, executive director of the Bluetooth SIG.

Of all the things to do on a sabbatical, Matt Du Puy, ARM, chose to climb Dhaulagiri (26,795feet /8161m), described as one of the most dangerous 8,000m mountains. Brian Fuller, ARM, reports that he is armed a GPS watch with cached terrain data and some questionable film choices on a portable WiDi disk station.

Still with extremes of weather, the Atmel team, enthuses about a KickStarter project for the Oombrella, a smart umbrella that uses sensors to analyse temperature, pressure, humidity and light, to let you know if you will need it because rain is coming your way. Very clever as long as you remember to bring it with you. Not so appealing is the capacity to share via social media the type of weather you are experiencing – and they say the Brits are obsessed with the weather!

IoT protection is occupying an unidentified blogger at Rambus, who longs for a Faraday cage to shield it. The blog has some interesting comments about the make up of, and security measures for the IoT, while promoting the company’s CryptoManager.

Still with IoT security, Richard Anguiano, Mentor Graphics examines a gateway using ARM TrustZone, and heterogeneous operating system configurations and running Nucleus RTOS and Mentor Embedded Linux. There is a link provided to the Secure Converged IoT Gateway and the complete end-to-end IoT solution.

Europe is credited as the birthplace for the Workplace Transformation, but Thomas Garrison, Intel. Ahead of CEBIT he writes about the role of Intel’s 6 th Generation Core vPro processor and what it could mean for a PC’s battery life, compute performance and the user’s productivity.

The prospects for MIPI and future uses in wearables, machine learning, virtual reality and automotive ADAS are uppermost in the mind of Hezi Saar, Synopsys, following MIPI Alliance meetings. He was particularly taken with a Movidius vision processor unit, and includes a video in the blog.

Examining dark silicon, Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, wonders what will supercede Dennard Scaling to overcome the limitations on power on large SoCs.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, March 07, 2016

Monday, March 7th, 2016

IP fingerprinting; Beware- 5G!; And the award goes to – encryption; Fear of FinFET; Smart kids; Virtual vs real hardware

Keeping an eye on the kids blends with wearable technology, as demonstrated by the Omate Whercom K3, which debuted at Mobile World Congress 2016. It relies on a 3G Dual-core 1GHz ARM Cortex-A7 and an ARM Mali-400 GPU, relates Freddi Jeffries, who interviews Laurent Le Pen, CEO of Omate.

The role of MicroEJ has evolved since its inception. Brian Fuller, ARM, looks at the latest incarnation, bringing mobile OS to microcontroller platforms such as the ARM Cortex-M.

Rather overshadowned by the Oscars, the winner of this year’s Turing Award could have more impact on everyday lives. It was won, says Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, by Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman for the invention of public key cryptography. His blog explains what the judges liked and why we will like their work too.

The inclusion of a Despicable Me photo/video is not immediately obvious, but Valerie Scott, Mentor Graphics makes a sound argument for the use of a virtual platform and includes a (relevant) image of the blog’s example hardware, the NXP i.MX6 with Vista.

Everyone is getting excited about 5G, and Matthew Rosenquist, Intel, sounds a note of caution and encourages readers to prepare for cyber risks as well as the opportunities that the technology will bring.

Fed up with FinFET issues? Graham Etchells, Synopsys, offers advice on electro-migration, why it happens and why the complexity of FinFETs does not have to mean it is an inevitable trait.

Efficiency without liabilities is the end-goal for Warren Savage, IP Extreme. He advocates IP fingerprinting and presents a compelling argument for why and how.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 29, 2016

Monday, February 29th, 2016

ARM and Xilinx Embedded World highlights; Mobile World Congress news; Sensors are on a roll; What makes MIPI?

Ahead of the ARM Cortex-A32 processor announcement at Embedded World and Mobile World Congress, ARM announced its latest real-time processor IP, the ARM Cortex-R8, designed for LTE-Advanced and 5G designs. Neil Wermuller, ARM goes into detail about the Cortex-R8 quad-core, real-time processor, building on the ARMv7-R architecture.

Also at Embedded World, Mentor Embedded teamed up with Xilinx which used demonstrated the Xilinx ZYNQ 7000 platform, hosting a Nucleus RTOS. Andrew Patterson, Mentor, describes how this can be used in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS)

More power for less dollars is driving demand in the consumer market. Alexandru Voica, Imagination Technologies, explains how the latest additions to the PowerVR series, PowerVR Series8XE meets efficiency and performance requirements.

When someone says “pass the masking tape” do check that it’s not a sensor network. The Atmel team blogs about SensorTape, the MIT Media Lab’s Responsive Environments group project for a sensor network that is on a roll.

Ahead of the MIPI Alliance event (March 7), Hezi Saar, Synopsys looks at what makes up the specification as it moves from the mobile marketplace.

Using a real-life crime to illustrate hazards, ARM’s Simon Segars focused on security at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain last week, reports Paul McLellan, Cadence. Other areas of interest was virtual reality, and an appearance by F1 racing driver, Lewis Hamilton, under the guise of discussing CAN in vehicles and what street cars could learn from F1.

Still with Mobile World Congress, Gary Bronner, Rambus, is quoted in report of the demonstration there of thermal-enabled lensless smart sensor (LSS) technology, by Rambus Labs. With the capability to replace traditional thermal lenses for IoT in medical equipment, manufacturing as well as the less obvious smart cities and transportation, this is a new approach to imaging, driven by computing rather than optics.

Striving to reduce debug effort and increase productivity is a noble cause, championed by Aditya Mittal, Arrow Devices. He looks at the AX13 system bus and its virtues as well as the company’s PDA tool.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, January 25 2016

Monday, January 25th, 2016

In this week’s review, there is a Star Wars analogy, IoT security plans, a 30th anniversary and an unusual way of serving whisky

The dormant nature of some devices in the IoT are likened to the reawakening of Star Wars’ R2-D2 by Joe Hupcey III, Mentor Graphics. In an equally honorable and daring quest, he looks for the wisdom of ultra-low power design and verification for SoCs used in devices that wait a long time for reactivation.

FPGA with a dash of splash or on the rocks? Steve Leibson, Xilinx, explains how a bottle of fine whisky (scotch) ended up in a PC. It’s all in a good cause.

Three trends for embedded systems are identified by Amber Thousand, Critical Link. She explains how we should all be paying attention to user interfaces, the rise of complexity and integration, and a focus on core competencies.

This year marks 30 years since MIPS Computer Systems introduced the MIPS R2000 microprocessor chipset. Alexandru Voica, Imagination Technologies, considers the rise of RISC and where it has led.

Silicon is the best place to secure security features for the IoT, argues Matthew Rosenquist, Intel. He outlines the role Trusted Execution Environments (TEEs) play in the cyber future.

Clearly not a man that travels light, Navrai Nandra, Synopsys, concluded that if storage space is limited, instead of trying to close a bulging suitcase, think about moving up. His wait at the airport inspired an interesting blog on 3D stack technology to triple NAND capacity.

Looking at what the IoT design wins means for design at advanced nodes, Vassilios Gerousis, Cadence, considers the design rules for 10nm.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, January 11, 2016

Monday, January 11th, 2016

In this week’s review, as one blog has predictions for what 2016 holds, another reviews 2015. Others cover an autonomous flight drone; a taster of DesignCon 2016 and a bionic leg development.

Insisting it’s not black magic or fortune telling but a retelling of notes from past press announcements, Dick James, Chipworks, thinks 2016 will be a year of mixed fortunes, with a low profile for leading edge processes and plenty of activity in memory and sensors as the sectors reap the rewards of developments being realized in the marketplace.

Looking back on 2015, Tom De Schutter, Synopsys, is convinced that the march of software continues and world domination is but a clock cycle away. His questions prompted some interesting feedback on challenges, benefits and working lives.

Looking ahead to autonomous drone flight, Steve Leibson, Xilinx, reports on the the beta release of Aerotenna’s OCPoC (Octagonal Pilot on Chip) ready-to-fly drone-control, based on a Zynq Z-7010 All Programmable SoC with integrated IMU (inertial measurement unit) sensors and GPS receiver.

Bigger isn’t always better, explains Doug Perry, Doulos, in a guest blog for Aldec. As well as outlining the issues facing those verifying larger FPGAs, he provides a comprehensive, and helpful, checklist to tackle this increasingly frequent problem, while throwing in a plug for two webinars on the subject.

Some people have barely unpacked from CES, and ANSYS is already preparing for DesignCon 2016. Margaret Schmitt previews the company’s plan for ‘designing without borders’ with previews of what, and who, can be seen there.

A fascinating case study is related by Karen Schulz, Gumstix, on the ARM Community blog site. The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago has (RIC) has developed the first neural-controlled bionic leg, without using no nerve redirection surgery or implanted sensors. The revolution is powered by the Gumstix Overo Computer-on-Module.

Showing empathy for engineers struggling with timing closure, Joe Hupcey III, Mentor Graphics, has some sound advice and diagnoses CDC problems. It’s not as serious as it sounds, CDC, or clock domain crossing, can be addressed with IEEE 1801 low power standard. Just what the doctor ordered.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, December 14, 2015

Monday, December 14th, 2015

Security check from ARM Techcon; IC layout nostalgia; The Why for PHY; Counterfeit measures; Why Arrow targets Python over Perl; Mentor Graphics signal integrity Q&A

Following ARM Techcon, Rob Coombs, ARM, has posted his presentation from the event, following his blog last month updating readers on the spread of TrustZone and the new security sub-sytems, TrustZone CryptoCell.

What some people will do to delay the chore of cleaning out the garage. Graham Etchells, Synopsys, bought some time from the boring chore by examining some photos he found there of the first CALMA systems he worked on. They provoked some interesting musings, and I wonder if the garage is now pristine – and if any other treasures were unearthed.

I love Whiteboard Wednesdays – and December’s contribution keeps up the high standard. Corrie Callenbach, Cadence, has posted a video where William Chen looks into the implementation of multi-link, multi-protocol PHY.

Legislation has been approved by the US House of Representatives to advance the battle against counterfeit semiconductors. Dustin Todd, SIA, explains what the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 (H.R. 644/S.1269) will mean. The association’s whitepaper is available to download, via a link in the post. Winning the Battle Against Counterfeit Semiconductor Products is available free, from the SIA Counterfeiting Task Force.

Decisions, decisions: Aditya Mittal, Arrow Devices, relates how the distributor has opted for Python for scripting code.

Getting to grips with the topic of signal integrity, Gabe Moretti, Chip Design, approached Karen Chow, Mentor Graphics, who gives some detailed, yet concise answers to his questions, making a succinct, yet informative Q&A.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review, Monday, November 30, 2015

Monday, November 30th, 2015

ARM – celebrating 25 years and virtual reality; Light and smart; Say hi to Li-Fi; Power management in wearable devices; Happy Thanksgiving, the Brit test

An interesting blog by Freddi Jeffries, ARM, looks at Virtual Reality, its present status and its future in mobile devices, its challenges and pitfalls.

LED technology is at the heart of the Internet of Experiences, explains Neno, Dassault Systèmes, in a blog about smart cities and looking ahead to its presence at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January.

Putting together a cheat-sheet for geeks, Bill Vandermark, Ansys, has a link to an article about Li-Fi which makes Wi-Fi look as slow as the telegraph.

Although not exactly an ingénue, Gabe Moretti, Chip Design, attended his first ARM Tech Con this month and liked what he found. Embracing the Maker community is to be encouraged, although he finds that politeness can run the risk of shorting circuits.

A cliché, but still effective: Dick Tracy as a reference for wearable devices makes Warren Kurisu, Mentor Graphics an eye-catching read. In this instalment, Kurisu tackles the thorny problem of power management – not just optimising it but architecting and developing a system that takes full advantage of the hardware.

While the USA celebrated Thanksgiving on Thursday, the next day saw ARM commemorate 25 years since in spun out of Acorn Computers (November 27 1990). Neil Cooper, ARM, charts the early days of Advanced RISC Machines with the company’s first press release, some financial and technical milestones from the last quarter century.

(Belated) Happy Thanksgiving. As a Brit, I would argue there would be no Thanksgiving without us! Paul McLellan, Cadence turns the tables and ask how much of a Brit are you? Try his simple quiz. (Although my tests would also include, do you refer to ‘football’ or ‘soccer’? and do you give directions citing pubs and churches along the route or road juntions. (Brits answer yes to the first choices!)

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, November 16, 2015

Monday, November 16th, 2015

ARM TechCon 2015 highlights: IoT, mbed and magic; vehicle monitoring systems; the road ahead for automotive design

It’s crunch time for IoT, announced ARM CEO Simon Segars at ARM TechCon. Christine Young, Cadence reports on what Segars believes is needed to get the IoT right.

Posing as a ‘booth babe’, Richard Solomon, Synopsys, was also at ARM TechCon demonstrating the latest iteration of DesignWare IP for PCI Express 4.0. As usual, there are pictures illustrating some of the technology, this time around switch port IP and Gen2 PCI, and quirky pictures from the show floor, to give readers a flavor of the event.

Tracking the progress of mbed OS, Chris Ciufo, eecatalog, prowled the mbed Zone at this year’s ARM TechCon, finding IoT ‘firsts’ and updates of wearables.

Enchanted by IoT, Eric Gowland, ARM, found ARM TechCon full of wonder and magic – or, to paraphrase Arthur C Clark, technology that was indistinguishable from magic. There are some anecdotes from the event – words and pictures – of how companies are using the cloud and the IoT and inspiring the next generation of magicians.

Spotting where Zynq devices are used in booth displays, might become an interesting distraction when I am visiting some lesser shows in future. I got the idea from Steve Leibson, Xilinx, who happened upon the Micrium booth at ARM TechCon where one was being used, stopping to investigate, he found out about free μC/OS for Makers.

Back to Europe, where DVCon Europe was help in Munich, Germany (November 11-12). John Aynsley, Doulos, was pleased that UVM is alive and well and companies like Aldec are realising that help and support is needed.

Identifying the move from behavior-based driver monitoring systems to inward-looking, camera-based systems, John Day, Mentor Graphics, looks at what this will use of sensors will mean for automakers who want to combine value and safety features.
Deciding how many functions to offer will be increasingly important for automakers, he advises.

Still with the automotive industry, Tomvanvu, Atmel, addresses anyone designed for automotive embedded systems and looks at what is driving progression for the inevitable self-driving cars.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Next Page »