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Posts Tagged ‘On Semiconductor’

Blog Review – Monday, November 6, 2017

Monday, November 6th, 2017

This week, we find that ANSYS gets hyper about Hyperloop development, Xilinx puts its mind to networks, Maxim supports factory automation and NXP, Mentor and ON Semiconductor explain why and how a product can be used.

A positively upbeat tone is set by Maxim Integrated’s Jeff DeAngelis, as he looks at how Industry 4.0 and automation is bringing back jobs. He looks at how being competitive through automation is leading to reshoring activity.

The now infamous ‘Jeep hack’ is the starting point for Timo van Roermund, the security architect at NXP considers what safeguards are needed and how the car domain needs to be re-thought for security on the roads. As well as citing several NXP products, there are also some useful links.

There’s a new look to the Mentor Graphics blogs and Michael Nopp uses it to good effect to take us through the company’s PADS Professional. His use of clear, colourful graphics adds to a simply told design guide.

Who isn’t super-excited about Hyperloop technology at the moment? Adora Anound Tadros, HyperXite guests on the ANSYS site to tell us how the team from University of California, Irvine, used simulation tools for its entry in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod competition. The team is gaining momentum and was in the top six of this year’ competition and is planning to compete again in 2018 – with a self-propulsion pod design.

Smile, you’re on camera, says an image-conscious Jason Liu, ON Semiconductor. He looks at the changing roles of cameras in our lives and introduces the company’s digital image sensor.

Another current favourite topic is neural networks. Steve Leibson proudly relates how a team at the University of Birmingham in the UK has implemented a deep recurrent neural network on a Xilinx Zynq Z-7020 SoC using the Python programming language.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, July 24, 2017

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Let’s hear it for High Fidelity Gaming and it’s all about the IoT, with PCB schematic tips from Mentor and security from Maxim; Inside NI’s 5G test lab and hope for Parkinson’s Disease research

Serious gamers are intriguing Freddi Jeffries, ARM. She looks at High Fidelity Mobile Gaming (HFMG) and who’s adopting it and where. Can mobile devices, based on Mali graphics processing units (GPUs) take on the console market?

A personal and heart-felt post by Altium Designer, Altium, looks at medical advances in treating Parkinson’s Disease. An overview of research by assorted technology companies manages to combine various uses for spoons, concludes with a gentle plug for PCB design software.

Stil with PCBs, John McMillan, Mentor Graphics Design presents part four of an IoT PCB design-themed series. The topic is schematic and layout design, from creating the schematic to component placement and constraint management for effective manufacture.

IoT security is keeping Christine Young, Maxim Integrated occupied – she is keeping busy finding out the scale of cybercrime, and the worrying lack of action companies to take steps for security. She flags up a free webinar on how to safeguard connected devices.

Taking a practical approach is applauded by Michael DeLuca, ON Semiconductor. He likes the attitude of the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, whose students are preparing to launch its Flying Laptop satellite.

Taking a sneaky peek at the National Instruments’ 5G Innovation Lab, Steve Leibson, Xilinx, celebrates the company’s Virtex-7 and Kintex-7 FGPAs use in Verizon’s 5GTF (Verizon 5G Technology Forum) test equipment. The Forum is developing a 28/39GHz wireless communications platform to replace fiber in fixed-wireless applications.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, April 24, 2017

Monday, April 24th, 2017

This week’s blogs are concerned with AI and intelligent, connected vehicles, sometimes both. There are quests to find the facts behind myths and searches for answers for power management and software security too.

Is an effective tool for verification, the stuff of legends? Gabe Moretti, Chip Design Magazine, seeks the truth behind Pegasus – no, not the winged horse, the more earthly verification engine from Cadence.

A power strategy is one thing, but a free trial adds a new dimension to energy management. Don Dingee, Sonics, elaborates on the company’s plan to bring power to the masses, using hardware IP and ICE-Grain Power architecture.

If you are unsure about USB, Senad Lomigora, ON Semiconductor’s blog should help. It looks at what it’s for, why we can’t get enough of USB Type C, USB 3.1, connectors and re-drivers.

Every vehicle’s ADAS relies on good visuals, observes Jim Harrison, guest blogger, Maxim Integrated, and good connectivity. He looks at the securely connected autonomous car, and then homes in on explained how Maxim Integrated exploits GMSL, an alternative to Ethernet, in its MAX96707 and MAX96708 chips, to create an effective in-car communication network.

Still with the connected car, Pete Decher, Mentor Graphics, is fresh from the Autotech Council meeting in San Jose. The company’s DRS360 Autonomous Driving Platform launch was high on the list of discussion topics, along with the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of driving.

Still with AI, Evens Pan, ARM provides an in-depth blog on Chinese start-up, Peceptin’s enabled embedded deep learning. The case study is fascinating and well reported in this comprehensive essay.

Making any software engineer feel insecure about software security is an everyday occurrence, helping them out is a little more out-of-the-ordinary, so if it refreshing to see a post from the editorial team, Synopsys, letting the put-upon software engineer know there is a webinar coming soon (May 2) to enlighten them on the Building Security In Maturity Model (BSIMM), with a link to register to attend.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, April 10, 2017

Monday, April 10th, 2017

This week, there are traps and lures in the IoT, as discussed by ARM and Maxim Integrated; Xilinx believes a video tutorial is a good use of time; Get cosy with SNUG for some insight; and ON Semiconductor is keeping an eye on you

Beware of delivery men bearing IoT gifts, warns, Donnie Garcia, ARM, who also looks at trap doors and NXP’s Kinetis KBOOT bootloader to foil a new attack vector and advertise a related webinar on April 25.

Nagging parents had the right idea, decides Russ Klein, Mentor Graphics, remembering entreaties to turn off lights, and whose energy saving advice he now applies to SoCs and embedded systems, with the help of the Veloce emulator.

Gabe Moretti, Chip Design, gets a bit saucy, trying to figure just what is Portable Stimulus. He gets down to the nitty gritty with how the Accellera System Initiative can help, but still believes some areas need to attended to. Let’s hope the industry pays heed.

More warnings from Kris Ardis, Maxim Integrated, and connected devices. While a Jacquard print may not be to everyone’s taste, the idea of protecting the IoT and its data has universal appeal.

The appeal of Agile design is not lost on Randy Smith, Sonics, who writes about the concept and Agile software development. He deftly dives into advances in Agile hardware design and IC methodology for Agile techniques – keeping every design engineer on their toes.

A visit to ISC West, the security expo, has made Jason Liu, ON Semiconductor, think about surveillance systems, as he throws a spotlight on one of the company’s introductions.

14 minutes does not sound like a long time to pack in all you need to know about Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoCs and Vivado Design Suite, but Steve Leibson, Xilinx points readers towards an interesting, informative video, which he describes as a fast and painless way to see the development tools used in a fully operation system.

It sounds like a self-satisfied neck-warmer, but SNUG (Synopsys User Group) events can be informative. Tom De Schutter attended the one in Silicon Valley and relates what he learned from the technical track with experts from ARM, NVIDIA, Intel and Synopsys about prototyping latch-based designs, ARM CPU and GPU increasing densities and more besides.

Striving to improve the lot of IoT designers, John Blyler, Embedded Systems, talks to Jim Bruister, SOC Solutions, about markets, licensing, open source and five elements that will drive improvement.

Compiled by Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 13, 2017

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Among this week’s topics: two important announcements: the OpenFog Consortium and IEEE Standard for the Functional Verification Language e; a panel discusses the Internet and beyond; Mentor Graphics applies IoT to PCB design; FASTR accelerates the connected car and why USB is not as easy as 123

The importance of IP blocks is a given, but Rocke Acree, ON Semiconductor, explains how selection also has to consider technology and support tools. The company has collaborated with Hexius Semiconductor to qualify analog IP blocks to reduce design cycles and development time.

There are specific constraints, challenges and design requirements for PCBs designed for the burgeoning IoT market. John McMillan, Mentor Graphics has created a two-part blog focused on this topic.

Doing a quickstep around the topic of USB, Eric Huang, Synopsys, explores verification and FPGA prototyping for best results. He recommends some design rules, a test site, then curiously, throws in some political comment, a film review and dance-related jokes to end the blog.

It may not be an understatement by Rhonda Dirvin, ARM, to say that the day the OpenFog Consortium announced its reference architecture is the day we have all been waiting for. Hyperbole? Possibly not, as it defines how secure, interoperable products should be built – just what the connected world needs. She helpfully includes a link to the architecture, and a heads-up on a presentation at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain (Feb 27 to March 3).

If there is an award for Most Apt Acronym, the Future of Automotive Security Technology Research (FASTR) consortium, must be a contender. The uncredited Rambus blog reviews the brief history of the consortium, and discusses its recent manifesto, looking at why it is need for a secure, connected vehicle industry.

2017 begins with the publication of IEEE Std 1647 2016, the IEEE Standard for the Functional Verification Language e. of 2017. Efrat Shneydor, Cadence Design, looks at the enhancements which have been made and proficiently summarizes the highlights.

Generic connectivity is not enough – NASA has been designing, building and launching satellite systems with the goal of providing connectivity throughout the world. The concept and realities of the Internet of Space is the panel discussion topic, reported by John Blyler, Chip Design Magazine.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, July 25, 2016

Monday, July 25th, 2016

This week, the blogsphere is chasing Pokemon, applying virtual reality as a medical treatment, cooking up a treat with multi-core processors, revisiting Hybrid Memory Cube, analysing convergence in the automotive market – and then there was the ARM acquisition

Have you bumped into anyone, head down as they hunt for Pickachu in Pokémon GO? Eamonn Ahearne, ON Semiconductor vents some frustration but also celebrates the milestone in virtual reality that is sweeping the nation(s).

Virtual reality is also occupying Samantha Zee, Nvidia, who relates an interesting, and moving, case study about pain management using virtual reality

The role of the car is changing, and Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, identifies that convergence is a driving force, boosting mobility with an increase in the vehicle’s electronics content, presenting new challenges for system engineers.

You are always going to grab my attention with a blog that mentions food, or a place where food can be made. Taylor K, Intel, compares multi-core processors to a kitchen, albeit an industrial one. Food for thought.

Virtualization is revitalizing embedded computing, according to Alex Voica, Imagination Technologies. The blog has copious mentions of the company’s involvement in the technology, but also some design ideas for IoT, device authentication, anti-cloning and robotics.

What will the SoftBank acquisition of ARM mean for the IoT industry, ponders Gabe Moretti, Chip Design Magazine. Is SoftBank underestimating other players in the market?

Still with ARM, which recently bought UK imaging company, Apical, Freddi Jeffries, ARM, has a vision – how computing will use images, deep learning and neural networks. Exciting times, not just for the company, but for the industry.

Micron’s Hybrid Memory Cube (HMC) architecture is five years old, so Priya Balasubramanian, Cadence Design Systems, delves into the memory technology which is having a mini resurgence, and the support options available.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday February 2, 2015

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

2015’s must-have – a personal robot, Thumbs up for IP access, USB 3.1 has landed, Transaction recap, New talent required, Structuring medical devices, MEMS sensors webinar

Re-living a youth spent watching TV cartoons, Brad Nemire, ARM, marvels at the Personal Robot created by Robotbase. It uses an ARM-based board powered by a Quad-core Qualcomm Krait CPU, so he interviewed the creator, Duy Huynh, Founder and CEO of Robotbase and found out more about how it was conceived and executed. I think I can guess what’s on Nemire’s Christmas list already.

Getting a handle on security access to big data, Michael Ford, Mentor Graphics, suggests a solution to accessing technology IP or patented technology without resorting to extreme measures shown in films and TV.

Celebrating the integration of USB 3.1 in the Nokia N1 tablet and other, upcoming products, Eric Huang, Synopsys, ties this news in with access to “the best USB 3.1 webinar in the universe”, which – no great surprise – is hosted by Synopsys. He also throws in some terrible jokes – a blog with something for everyone.

A recap on transaction-based verification is provided by Axel Scherer, Cadence, with the inevitable conclusion that the company’s tools meet the task. The blog’s embedded video is simple, concise and informative and worth a click.

Worried about the lack of new, young engineers entering the semiconductor industry, Kands Manickam, IP extreme, questions the root causes for the stagnation.

A custom ASIC and ASSP microcontroller combine to create the Struix product, and Jakob Nielsen, ON Semiconductor, explains how this structure can meet medical and healthcare design parameters with a specific sensor interface.

What’s the IoT without MEMS sensors? Tim Menasveta, ARM, shows the way to an informative webinar : Addressing Smart Sensor Design Challenges for SoCs and IoT, hosted in collaboration with Cadence, using its Virtuoso and MEMS Convertor tools and the Cortex-M processors.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday Oct 13, 2014

Monday, October 13th, 2014

Cambridge Wireless discusses wearables; Cadence unmask Incisive ‘hidden treasures’; ON Semi advocates ESD measures; Synopsys presents at DVCON Europe; 3DIC reveals game-changer move at IEEE S3S

At this month’s Cambridge Wireless SIG (Special Interest Group) David Maidment, ARM, listened to an exchange of ideas for wearable and new business opportunities but with considerations for size, cost and consumer ease of use.

Revealing rampant prejudice for all physical media, Axel Scherer, Cadence, learns a lesson in features that are taken for granted and offers a list of 10 features in Incisive that may not be evident to many users.

Silicon ESD protection need to consider automotive designers, encourages Deres Eshete, explaining the reasons why ON Semiconductor has introduced the ESD7002, ESD7361, and ESD7461 ESD protection devices.

This week, DVCON Europe will include a tutorial from Synopsys about VCS AMS to extend digital verification for mixed-signal SoCs. Hélène Thibiéroz and colleagues from Synopsys, STMicroelectronics and Micronas will present October 14, but some hits of what to expect are on her blog.

Following on from the 2014 IEEE S3S conference, Zvi Or-Bach, discusses how monolithic 3D IC will be a game changer as he considers how existing fab transistor processes can be used and looks ahead to EDA efforts for the technology, covered at the conference.

Caroline Hayes – Monday October 13, 2014