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More space for satellites and a roadmap for data protection

Monday, February 12th, 2018

Blog Review – Monday, February 12, 2018
This week’s selection includes 100G Ethernet for data centers; Satellites will vie for space; A roadmap for data protection, and more from the blogsphere

The rise of data centers and increase in cloud-based computing has prompted Lance Looper, Silicon Labs, to examine how wireless networks are changing to meet the demands for performance and low latency and implementing 100G Ethernet.

https://www.silabs.com/community/blog.entry.html/2018/02/05/ethernet_s_role_inh-pTeJ

Marveling at how connectivity has ‘shrunk’ the world, Paolo Colombo, ANSYS, looks skywards to consider the growth of connected devices. He looks at the role of space satellites and how small satellites will have their day for critical applications and introduces ‘pseudo sats’ which are vying for space in space.

An article about medical device design and manufacturing challenges has prompted Roger Mazzella, QT, to address each and provide a response to reassure developers. Naturally, QT’s products play a role in allaying many fears, but it is an interesting insight into the medical design arena.

An interesting case study is recorded by Hellen Norman, Arm, featuring Scratchy the robot. She asks German embedded systems developer, Sebastian Förster how he used a Cortex-M4, some motors, Lego bricks and cable ties to create a four-legged robot, programmed to walk using artificial intelligence (AI).

It’s not unusual to feel bewildered at a technology conference, so we can sympathise with Thomas Hackett, Cadence, who has a twist on the usual philosophical question of “What am I here for?” A walk through DesignCon caused a lightbulb moment, illuminating the real world interplay of IP, SoC and packaging.

With the IoT there are no secrets, and Robert Vamosi, Synopsys examines how data sharing may not be as innocuous as companies would have us believe, if it is not configured flawlessly. The Strava heatmap which reveals secret military locations has thrown up some serious issues which, we are assured, are being addressed, and which Vamosi sees as a model for other IoT and wearable device manufacturers.

Tackling software-defined networking (SDN) head-on, Jean-Marie Brunet, Mentor Graphics, presents a clear and strong case for accelerating verification using virtual emulation. Of course he advocates Veloce VirtuaLAB PCIe for the task, but backs up his recommendation with some sound reasoning and guidance.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Driving To the Shops with Graphics and Bluetooth

Monday, January 29th, 2018

The car’s the star this week, as bloggers look to upgrade models, examine the safety systems, and look at how to use graphics. Other posts concentrate on retail therapy and how Bluetooth can help warehouses manage stock and processes

There’s only 330 days shopping days until Christmas, and Intel’s Ryan Parker’s blog could change how those days pan out as retail is redefined with IoT, artificial intelligence (AI), and digital signage combined with video to make the shopping experience to not only meet customer demands, but changing supply chains too.

Examining the backbone of automotive safety systems, Sandeep Taneja, Synopsys, presents an informed and well-illustrated post on what is needed and for what purpose in safety conscious vehicles.

Graphics double data rate (GDDR) memory has evolved to exceed the realm of gamers and is now used in vehicles. A blog by Rambus charts the changes and benefits of graphics technology for both inside and outside the car, and how it can be used in other markets.

The spread of the industrial IoT brings opportunities for warehouses of the future, writes Torbjørn Øvrebekk, Nordic Semiconductor. He looks at what the Bluetooth Mesh standard will mean and the benefits it will bring for networks and energy useage.

Corrie Callenbach, Cadence, has identified a great video hosted by Nick Heaton, distinguished engineer, Cadence, describing the verification challenges for SoCs when integrating CCIX (Cache Coherent Chip-to-Chip Protocol) IP.

Aligning CAD to a car leads an anonymous blogger at Altium to reminisce about old cars owned, cared for, restored, driven and abandoned when adulthood beckoned and manages to make a comparison with upgrading to the 64-bit world where PCB designers now live and work. Nostalgia mixes with practical tips on scaling up.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, October 23, 2017

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

This week blogs are focused on health and AI, from remote care for the elderly to asthma inhalers using machine learning; plus sewer cleaning and multimedia SoCs

The autonomous car can reduce hospital visits by visiting patients – but won’t that put more cars on the road? David P Ryan, Intel advocates a delivery service for the next generation of healthcare.

Taking an engineer’s view on every object, Peter Ferguson, Arm, looks at the asthma inhaler and takes a deep breath at the Amiko ‘smart’ inhaler which uses an Arm Cortex-M processor.

Former Cadence employee, Vishal Kapoor, presented Preparing for the Cognitive Era, at San Jose State University. Paul McLellan, Cadence reports on why Kapoor is worried about the amount of data companies are collecting.

The importance of video content, used in augmented reality devices and 4K UHD TV, relies on efficient multimedia SoCs. Richard Pugh, Mentor, looks at some of the ways and means to verify the data and cites an interesting example of a customer developing a drone.

No wonder it’s called Solo – who would want to join RedZone Robotics’ autonomous sewer-inspection robot (called Solo)? Steve Leibson, Xilinx, uncovers the clean workings of the robot that crawls and records where others refuse to go, and explains how it uses Spartan FPGA for image processing and for AI. (There’s a video too – but it’s not a mucky one!)

Enough about the IoT, says Jim Harrison, Lincoln Technology Communications, guest blogging for Maxim Integrated. What about how to connect millions of sensors and actuators? He lays out a comprehensive ‘shopping list’ of long range wireless comms and connection options to help speed up the IoT conversation.

Coming full circle, Marc Horner, ANSYS, relates the case study of computational modeling for insulin delivery systems.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday, May 8, 2017

Monday, May 8th, 2017

This week, there is some N7 news, and the beginning of an HPC renaissance; ARM survives a mountain-top ordeal and Intel has a strategy for IoT; Odd place for sunburn

https://community.cadence.com/cadence_blogs_8/b/breakfast-bytes/archive/2017/05/05/tsmc-n7

TSMC’s 7nm process is detailed by Paul McLellan, Cadence, from a visit to CDNLive Silicon Valley. His report is well illustrated and informative.

Predicting a second renaissance in high-performance computing (HPC), Prasad Alavilli, ANSYS, explains the role of CFD and the state-of-play for HPC and what that means for chip design.

Likening Internet security to the American ‘wild west’, Alan Grau, Icon Labs, fears for security measures and corrective actions. He looks at some recent attacks and cures and advocates a strong stance on security.

I suspect Scott Salzwedel, Mentor Graphics, is rather excited about the New Horizons spacecraft, which is due to emerge from its hibernation. His enthusiasm is infectious, and his well-illustrated blog puts the reader as in thrall to the project – and the role of the company’s own Nucleus RTOS – as he clearly is.

The three phases of the IoT revolution are set out by Aaron Tersteeg, Intel. He sets out a clear plan to nuture big ideas and how technology can support the evolution.

PVT (process, voltage and temperature) sensor systems are exciting Rupert Baines, UltraSoC. He considers the company’s co-operation with Moortec Semiconductor, and what this means for SoC monitoring.

Life is not looking too rosy for ARM engineer Matt Du Puy and fellow climbers, at the moment. They are stuck on Mt Kanchenjunga in Nepal, without the drone copter that was confiscated by customs officials. True the team has a toolbox of ARM-powered devices, like the Suunto Ambit smartwatch, satellite beacon, Outernet networking device, Google Pixel smartphone, Go Pro and Ricoh Theta 360-degree camera, reports Brian Fuller, ARM, but there is also sunburn – inside the nostrils (eughhh!).

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

New specs for PCI Express 4.0; Smart homes gateway webinar this week; sensors – kits and tools; the car’s the connected star; Intel unleashes AI

Change is good – isn’t it? Richard Solomon, Synopsys, prepares for the latest draft of PCI Express 4.0, with some hacks for navigating the 1,400 pages.

Following a triumphant introduction at ARM TechCon 016, Diya Soubra, ARM, examines the ARM Cortex-M33 from the dedicated co-processor interface to security around the IoT.

Steer clear of manipulating a layout hierarchy, advises Rishu Misri Jaggi, Cadence Design Systems. She advocates the Layout XL Generation command to put together a Virtuoso Layout XL-compliant design, with some sound reasoning – and a video – to back up her promotion.

A study to save effort is always a winner and Aditya Mittal and Bhavesh Shrivastava, Arrow, include the results of their comparisons in performing typical debug tasks. Although the aim is to save time, the authors have spent time in doing a thorough job on this study.

Are smart homes a viable reality? Benny Harven, Imagination Technologies, asks for a diary not for a webinar later this week (Nov 23) for smart home gateways – how to make them cost-effective and secure.

Changes in working practice mean sensors and security need attention and some help. Scott Jones, Maxim Integrated looks at the company’s latest reference design.

Still with sensors, Brian Derrick, Mentor Graphics Design, looks at how smartphones are opening up opportunities for sensor-based features for the IoT.

This week’s LA Auto Show, inspires Danny Shapiro, NVIDIA, to look at how the company is driving technology trends in vehicles. Amongst the name dropping (Tesla, Audi, IBM Watson) some of the pictures in the blog inspire pure auto-envy.

A guide to artificial intelligence (AI) by Douglas Fisher, Intel, has some insights into where and how it can be used and how the company is ‘upstreaming’ the technology.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, October 10, 2016

Monday, October 10th, 2016

This week, bloggers look at the newly released ARM Cortex-R52 and its support, NVIDIA floats the idea of AI in automotives, Dassault Systèmes looks at underwater construction, Intrinsic-ID’s CEO shares about security, and there is a glimpse into the loneliness of the long distance debugger

There is a peek into the Xilinx Embedded Software Community Conference as Steve Leibson, Xilinx, shares the OKI IDS real-time, object-detection system using a Zynq SoC.

The lure of the ocean, and the glamor of Porsche and Volvo SUVs, meant that NVIDIA appealed to all-comers at its inaugural GPU Technology Conference Europe. It parked a Porsche Macan and a Volvo XC90 on top of the Ocean Diva, docked at Amsterdam. Making waves, the Xavier SoC, the Quadro demonstration and a discussion about AI in the automotive industry.

Worried about IoT security, Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, looks at the source code that targets firmware on IoT devices, and fears where else it may be used.

Following the launch of the ARM Cortex-R52 processor, which raises the bar in terms of functional safety, Jason Andrews looks at the development tools available for the new ARMv8-R architecture, alongside a review of what’s new in the processor offering.

If you are new to portable stimulus, Tom A, Cadence, has put together a comprehensive blog about the standard designed to help developers with verification reuse, test automation and coverage. Of course, he also mentions the role of the company’s Perspec System Verifier, but this is an informative blog, not a marketing pitch.

Undersea hotels sounds like the holiday of the future, and Deepak Datye, Dassault Systèmes, shows how structures for wonderful pieces of architecture can be realized with the company’s , the 3DExperience Platform.

Capturing the frustration of an engineer mid-debug, Rich Edelman, Mentor Graphics, contributes a long, blow-by-blow account of that elusive, thankless task, that he names UVM Misery, where a customer’s bug, is your bug now.

Giving Pim Tuyls, CEO of Intrinsic-ID, a grilling about security, Gabe Moretti, Chip Design magazine, teases out the difference between security and integrity and how to increase security in ways that will be adopted across the industry.

Blog Review Monday, August 29, 2016

Monday, August 29th, 2016

This week’s blogs are futuristic, with machine learning, from Intel, augmented reality from Synopsys, smart city software from Dassault Systèmes, questions and answers about autonomous vehicles, and security issues, around devices and MQTT on the IoT.

Artificial intelligence is the next great wave, predicts Lenny Tran, Intel. His post looks at machine learning and Intel’s High Performance Computing architecture is part of the way forward in machine learning.

On a similar theme, Hezi Saar, Synopsys, examines the Microsoft 28nm SoC and is impressed with the possibilities for augmented reality that the HoloLens Processing Units has for this developing marketplace.

If you are dissatisfied with your present office location, Dassault Systèmes has plans for smart faciliites, reports Akio. He describes some illuminating projects using 3D Experience City, real-time monitoring, the IoT and systems operations for a comfortable workspace in smart cities.

It’s all about teamwork according to Brandon Wade, Aldec, who offers an introduction to the AXI protocol. His post summarizes the protocol specifications and shares his revelation at how understanding the protocol opens up a world of design possibilities.

Autonomous cars are occupying a lot of Eamonn Ahearne’s, ON Semiconductor, time. Living in the hotbed of self-drive test, he reads, visits and analyses what is happening and is disappointed that hardware is being eclipsed by software in the popularity stakes.

Also occupied with autonomous vehicles, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, starts with an update on electric vehicles, and moves onto the disconnect between ADAS technologies and autonomous vehicles and the engineering challenges that can be addressed using a single ECU (Engine Control Unit).

Attending the Linley Mobile & Wearables Conference, Paul McLellan, Cadence Design Systems, pays attention to Asaf Ashkenazi of Cryptography Research (now part of Rambus) and his well-illustrated post reports how devices can be secured.

An IoT network, powered by the ISO/IEC PRF 20922 standard MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport) can be at risk, warns Wilfred Nilsen, ARM. It is a sound warning about personal information being vulnerable to MQTT brokers. Luckily, he offers a solution, introducing the SMQ IoT protocol.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, August 15 2016

Monday, August 15th, 2016

In this collection, we define the IoT, investigate IP fingerprinting, and break into vehicles in the name of crypto-research. There is also prophesizing about 5G and disruption technology for technology, and relationship advice for computing and data.

Empathizing with anyone who has ever struggled with CMSIS RTOS API, Liviu Ionescu, ARM, offers a helping hand, catalogues the issues that can be encountered and reassures designers they are not alone and, more importantly, offers practical help.

Putting IP fingerprints to work may sound like the brief for an episode of CSI, but it is Warren Savage’s, (IP-extreme) recipe for successful SoC tapeout. He does do some CSI-style digging to thoroughly explain how to delve into a chip’s IP to limit the risks associated with IP reuse.

Listening intently at the Linley Mobile Conference, Paul McLellan, Cadence, sees the advent of 5G as good news for high-capacity, high-speed, low-latency wireless networks and linked with all things IoT.

Famous couplings, love and marriage, horse and carriage, could be joined by computing and data. Rob Crooke, Intel, believes that an increase in data and increased computing will transform cloud computing, but that memory storage has to keep up to realize smart cities to autonomous vehicles, industrial automation, medicine, immersive gaming to name a few. His post covers 3D XPoint and 3D NAND technology.

On security detail this week, Gabe Moretti, Chip Design magazine, finds a white paper from Intrinsic-ID that he recommends on the topic of embedded authentication which is vital to the secure operation of the IoT.

At the end of this year, the last Volkswagen Camper, (or kombi) van, will roll off the assembly line in Brazil. Robert Vamosi, Synopsys, includes the iconic vehicle in his post about a hack related in a paper authored by researchers at the University of Birmingham to clone a VW remote entry systems. The paper was presented at the Usenix cybersecurity conference in Austin, Texas, with reassurances that the group is in ‘constructive’ talks with VW.

For a vintage automobile to the latest, EV and PHEVs, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, looks at disruption they may bring to the automotive industry. Referring to account technology manager Paul Johnston’s presentation at 2016 IESF, he touches on the electrical engineering and embedded software challenges as well as the predicted scale of the EV industry.

Still looking at a market rather than the technology, Alex Voica, Imagination Technologies, looks at the IoT. He has some interesting graphs and statistics and asks some interesting questions around definitions, from what is the IoT and what defines a device.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Tuesday, May 31 2016

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

Security issues around IoT and maritime vessels; CCIX Consortium accelerates data centers; Cheers for metering; Noise integrity in ADAS; Virtual Reality in practice

Protecting IoT devices is clearly and elegantly outlined by Jim Wallace, ARM, he includes illustrations, a lot of information and guidelines on advice on how security can produce new business models.

Accelerating data centers always raises interest and when names like AMD, ARM, Huawei, IBM, Mellanox, Qualcomm, and Xilinx come together. Steve Liebson, Xilinx, describes how the companies, via the CCIX (Cache Coherent Interconnect for Accelerators) Consortium are developing a single interconnect technology specification whereby processors using different instruction set architectures can share data with accelerators and enable efficient heterogeneous computing to improve efficiency.

Advocating an alternative to the plan to drink beer when the fresh water runs out, David Andeen, Maxim explains the importance of an ultrasonic water meter which can accelerate design cycles and reduce the cost of meters.

All in the name of research, Alexandru Voica, Imagination, tries his hand at Daydream, the Virtual Reality (VR) platform built on Android N and outlines the rules of VR.

Another cyber threat is identified by Robert Vamosi, Synopsys. His blog looks at research from Plymouth University and how vulnerable marine vessels can be at risk.

The undeniable increase in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) needs careful design consideration, and Ravi Ravikumar, ANSYS, discusses how the ANSYS CPS simulation helps power noise integrity to be met. His blog is informative, with some clear graphics to illustrate ADAS design.

For a quick catch-up on USB 3.1 and the Type-C connector, turn to Chris A Ciufo, eecatalog, for a quick reference guide. He includes some handy links for extra reading.

A review of the Bangalore, India, Design&Reuse event is provided by Steve Brown, Cadence Design Systems. A rundown of keynotes ends with a head-up for the next event.

Blog Review – Monday, April 25 2016

Monday, April 25th, 2016

System validation partnership; Cloud’s blue sky thinking; Happy 50 th optic fiber; Back to PCIe basics; Pointing the fingerprint; Financial forecast

Retracing his steps, Richard Solomon, Synopsys, looks at the progress of PCI Express, and more specifically, how to handle the bandwidth increases. This blog details some solid principles and extends an offer of help for developers.

Fresh from rubbing shoulders with attendees of the SAE World Congress automotive industry technical conference and tradeshow, Pete Decher, Mentor Graphics, clearly has his eye on the latest Tesla model and its plans for autonomous driving. He reviews reactions to V2X (Vehicle to Infrastructure & Vehicle to Vehicle) and ECU (Electronic Control Unit) Consolidation.

Another review is delivered by Steve Brown, Cadence Design Systems, who attended the Optical Fiber Conference. He manages to celebrate the 50 th anniversary of fiber optic communications technology and looks at how it started and where it’s going.

Poring over financials is not everyone’s idea of fun, but Chris Ciufo, eecatalog, takes one for the team and compiled this blog about the economical outlook for the technology industry. He considers the role of the IoT, autonomous vehicles and their role on productivity.

Best practice for cloud computing is set out in the blog from Wim Slagter, ANSYS. He elaborates on eight Dos and Don’ts for High Performance Computing (HPC) and cloud computing to maximize it for engineering simulation.

Identifying the bottleneck of functional validation in SoC design, Eoin McCann, ARM, examines some of the IP tools the company offers to its ecodesign partners

New tools reduce the risk of IP reuse, believes Warren Savage, IP Extreme. He sets out a clear case for fingerprinting IP, a brief checklist and explains how Chip DNA Analysis software can be used in SoC design.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

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