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Posts Tagged ‘space’

More space for satellites and a roadmap for data protection

Monday, February 12th, 2018

Blog Review – Monday, February 12, 2018
This week’s selection includes 100G Ethernet for data centers; Satellites will vie for space; A roadmap for data protection, and more from the blogsphere

The rise of data centers and increase in cloud-based computing has prompted Lance Looper, Silicon Labs, to examine how wireless networks are changing to meet the demands for performance and low latency and implementing 100G Ethernet.

https://www.silabs.com/community/blog.entry.html/2018/02/05/ethernet_s_role_inh-pTeJ

Marveling at how connectivity has ‘shrunk’ the world, Paolo Colombo, ANSYS, looks skywards to consider the growth of connected devices. He looks at the role of space satellites and how small satellites will have their day for critical applications and introduces ‘pseudo sats’ which are vying for space in space.

An article about medical device design and manufacturing challenges has prompted Roger Mazzella, QT, to address each and provide a response to reassure developers. Naturally, QT’s products play a role in allaying many fears, but it is an interesting insight into the medical design arena.

An interesting case study is recorded by Hellen Norman, Arm, featuring Scratchy the robot. She asks German embedded systems developer, Sebastian Förster how he used a Cortex-M4, some motors, Lego bricks and cable ties to create a four-legged robot, programmed to walk using artificial intelligence (AI).

It’s not unusual to feel bewildered at a technology conference, so we can sympathise with Thomas Hackett, Cadence, who has a twist on the usual philosophical question of “What am I here for?” A walk through DesignCon caused a lightbulb moment, illuminating the real world interplay of IP, SoC and packaging.

With the IoT there are no secrets, and Robert Vamosi, Synopsys examines how data sharing may not be as innocuous as companies would have us believe, if it is not configured flawlessly. The Strava heatmap which reveals secret military locations has thrown up some serious issues which, we are assured, are being addressed, and which Vamosi sees as a model for other IoT and wearable device manufacturers.

Tackling software-defined networking (SDN) head-on, Jean-Marie Brunet, Mentor Graphics, presents a clear and strong case for accelerating verification using virtual emulation. Of course he advocates Veloce VirtuaLAB PCIe for the task, but backs up his recommendation with some sound reasoning and guidance.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, July 24, 2017

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Let’s hear it for High Fidelity Gaming and it’s all about the IoT, with PCB schematic tips from Mentor and security from Maxim; Inside NI’s 5G test lab and hope for Parkinson’s Disease research

Serious gamers are intriguing Freddi Jeffries, ARM. She looks at High Fidelity Mobile Gaming (HFMG) and who’s adopting it and where. Can mobile devices, based on Mali graphics processing units (GPUs) take on the console market?

A personal and heart-felt post by Altium Designer, Altium, looks at medical advances in treating Parkinson’s Disease. An overview of research by assorted technology companies manages to combine various uses for spoons, concludes with a gentle plug for PCB design software.

Stil with PCBs, John McMillan, Mentor Graphics Design presents part four of an IoT PCB design-themed series. The topic is schematic and layout design, from creating the schematic to component placement and constraint management for effective manufacture.

IoT security is keeping Christine Young, Maxim Integrated occupied – she is keeping busy finding out the scale of cybercrime, and the worrying lack of action companies to take steps for security. She flags up a free webinar on how to safeguard connected devices.

Taking a practical approach is applauded by Michael DeLuca, ON Semiconductor. He likes the attitude of the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, whose students are preparing to launch its Flying Laptop satellite.

Taking a sneaky peek at the National Instruments’ 5G Innovation Lab, Steve Leibson, Xilinx, celebrates the company’s Virtex-7 and Kintex-7 FGPAs use in Verizon’s 5GTF (Verizon 5G Technology Forum) test equipment. The Forum is developing a 28/39GHz wireless communications platform to replace fiber in fixed-wireless applications.

By Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday, May 8, 2017

Monday, May 8th, 2017

This week, there is some N7 news, and the beginning of an HPC renaissance; ARM survives a mountain-top ordeal and Intel has a strategy for IoT; Odd place for sunburn

https://community.cadence.com/cadence_blogs_8/b/breakfast-bytes/archive/2017/05/05/tsmc-n7

TSMC’s 7nm process is detailed by Paul McLellan, Cadence, from a visit to CDNLive Silicon Valley. His report is well illustrated and informative.

Predicting a second renaissance in high-performance computing (HPC), Prasad Alavilli, ANSYS, explains the role of CFD and the state-of-play for HPC and what that means for chip design.

Likening Internet security to the American ‘wild west’, Alan Grau, Icon Labs, fears for security measures and corrective actions. He looks at some recent attacks and cures and advocates a strong stance on security.

I suspect Scott Salzwedel, Mentor Graphics, is rather excited about the New Horizons spacecraft, which is due to emerge from its hibernation. His enthusiasm is infectious, and his well-illustrated blog puts the reader as in thrall to the project – and the role of the company’s own Nucleus RTOS – as he clearly is.

The three phases of the IoT revolution are set out by Aaron Tersteeg, Intel. He sets out a clear plan to nuture big ideas and how technology can support the evolution.

PVT (process, voltage and temperature) sensor systems are exciting Rupert Baines, UltraSoC. He considers the company’s co-operation with Moortec Semiconductor, and what this means for SoC monitoring.

Life is not looking too rosy for ARM engineer Matt Du Puy and fellow climbers, at the moment. They are stuck on Mt Kanchenjunga in Nepal, without the drone copter that was confiscated by customs officials. True the team has a toolbox of ARM-powered devices, like the Suunto Ambit smartwatch, satellite beacon, Outernet networking device, Google Pixel smartphone, Go Pro and Ricoh Theta 360-degree camera, reports Brian Fuller, ARM, but there is also sunburn – inside the nostrils (eughhh!).

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor


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