Part of the  

Chip Design Magazine

  Network

About  |  Contact

Posts Tagged ‘Zynq’

Blog Review – Monday, April 10, 2017

Monday, April 10th, 2017

This week, there are traps and lures in the IoT, as discussed by ARM and Maxim Integrated; Xilinx believes a video tutorial is a good use of time; Get cosy with SNUG for some insight; and ON Semiconductor is keeping an eye on you

Beware of delivery men bearing IoT gifts, warns, Donnie Garcia, ARM, who also looks at trap doors and NXP’s Kinetis KBOOT bootloader to foil a new attack vector and advertise a related webinar on April 25.

Nagging parents had the right idea, decides Russ Klein, Mentor Graphics, remembering entreaties to turn off lights, and whose energy saving advice he now applies to SoCs and embedded systems, with the help of the Veloce emulator.

Gabe Moretti, Chip Design, gets a bit saucy, trying to figure just what is Portable Stimulus. He gets down to the nitty gritty with how the Accellera System Initiative can help, but still believes some areas need to attended to. Let’s hope the industry pays heed.

More warnings from Kris Ardis, Maxim Integrated, and connected devices. While a Jacquard print may not be to everyone’s taste, the idea of protecting the IoT and its data has universal appeal.

The appeal of Agile design is not lost on Randy Smith, Sonics, who writes about the concept and Agile software development. He deftly dives into advances in Agile hardware design and IC methodology for Agile techniques – keeping every design engineer on their toes.

A visit to ISC West, the security expo, has made Jason Liu, ON Semiconductor, think about surveillance systems, as he throws a spotlight on one of the company’s introductions.

14 minutes does not sound like a long time to pack in all you need to know about Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoCs and Vivado Design Suite, but Steve Leibson, Xilinx points readers towards an interesting, informative video, which he describes as a fast and painless way to see the development tools used in a fully operation system.

It sounds like a self-satisfied neck-warmer, but SNUG (Synopsys User Group) events can be informative. Tom De Schutter attended the one in Silicon Valley and relates what he learned from the technical track with experts from ARM, NVIDIA, Intel and Synopsys about prototyping latch-based designs, ARM CPU and GPU increasing densities and more besides.

Striving to improve the lot of IoT designers, John Blyler, Embedded Systems, talks to Jim Bruister, SOC Solutions, about markets, licensing, open source and five elements that will drive improvement.

Compiled by Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, June 13, 2016

Monday, June 13th, 2016

DAC 2016 highlights; Medical technology and IoT; Autonomous car market races ahead; Remote controlled beer; Secure connectivity

Distinguishing between Big Data and Business Intelligence, ScientistBob, Intel, identifies a ‘watershed’ moment for Big Data and Intel’s steps with Intel Xeon processors to deliver the next step in data analytics.

In response to FCC regulations, the prpl Foundation addresses next-generation security for connected devices. Alexandru Voica, Imagination Techologies, has collected some useful information (demo, white paper, devices, kits and links) to show the progress made.

A fascinating medical application is detailed in Steve Leibso, Xilinx, as he describes how the Xynq-7000 SoC in an eye-tracking computer interface. The video is a little ‘salesy’ and could have benefitted from some more examples of use rather than talking heads but has some practical engineering information about how the processing moves to the SoC.

Continuing the medical theme, Thierry Marchal, ANSYS, tantalizes readers ahead of a medical IoT webinar (June 22) by Cambridge Consultants. He has some interesting statistics to put the topic into context, some graphics and an exploration of the communications protocols involved.

The 53 rd DAC saw ARM launch ARM Artisan physical IP, including POP IP, targeting mainstream mobile designs. Brian Fuller, ARM, adds some meat to the bones with comment from Will Abbey, general manager, ARM’s Physical Design Group.

Automotive design at DAC captured the interest of Christine Young, Cadence, who reports on the keynote by Lars Reger, CTO Automotive Business Unit, NXP Semiconductors. She looks at the security issues for vehicles from the family car to trucks.

Beer that comes to you takes the slog out of summer al fresco dining, doesn’t it? The Atmel team details the use of an ATmefa8 MCU for a remote controlled beer crate, with a link to the build recipe list.

Here in the UK, we are knee-deep in discussions about how to get on with our neighbours as an EU membership referendum looms. A model for happy international relations is here in the blog by Devi Keller, Semiconductor Industry Association, which records the 20 years of the World Semiconductor Council (WSC).

A trip to Detroit for Robert Bates, Mentor Graphics, for its IESF conference, was a source of great material for all things related to autonomous cars. Keynotes and networking led him to consider safety and neural network questions around the technology.

Putting it all into practise, the first Self Racing Cars track event is gleefully reported by Danny Shapiro, Nvidia. There are some great images capturing the spirit of a ground-breaking event. Last weekend a momentous event in the motorsports and automotive world took place. Of course, the company’s technology is used and there is a handy list of what was used and where.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review Monday April 11 2016

Monday, April 11th, 2016

Mbed development board seeks therapy; in praise of HPC; IoT security – can it be improved?; EDAC name change; acquisition fever runs high

Checking and testing safety critical systems can be performed using the Zynq-7000 All Programmable SoC (AP SoC) with dual ARM Cortex-A9 processors, and dual Neon FPUs. Austin, Xilinx, explains the routine.

Therapy from an mbed development board may not threat therapists just yet, but ELIZA, the computer program that simulates a psychotherapist, is now available for the mbed platform. The obvious question to ask Wilfred Nilsen, ARM, is “How do you feel about that?”

Who needs High Performance Computing (HPC), asks Wim Slagter, Ansys. He addresses computing as a strategic asset, scalability benefits and what to do with a server cluster.

The Internet of Things (IoT) security market will be worth $28.90 billion by 2020, yet it is flawed, argues an unattributed blog from Rambus. Interviews with Simon Blake-Wilson and Ted Harrington, Rambus, assess how much ground needs to be made up.

Still with security, Robert Vamosi, Synopsys reports on the Synopsys and Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) collaboration to create the UL Cybersecurity Assurance Program (UL CAP). The aim is to increase transparency and confidence in the security of network-connectable devices using expertise from both camps.

Looking ahead to the connected car, Andrew Macleod, Mentor Graphics, considers what will be coming together for a centralized processing system, handling communications and autonomous driving functions. The vehicle’s systems will be consolidated, but how best to achieve that is up for debate.

It may take some people a while to adjust, but the EDA Consortium has changed its name to the Electronic System Design Alliance. Gabe Moretti, Chip Design Magazine, looks at the whys and wherefores behind the change and the expertly analyses the Alliance’s expanded charter.

Intel has bought Yogitech, the functional safety company and Ken Caviasca, Intel, looks at what this means for the company and, in particular, its IoT offering.

Still with acquisitions, it is all getting a bit too much for Chris Ciufo, eecatalog, who traces some recent ‘musical chairs’ before focusing on what the Mercury Computer purchase of three Microsemi businesses will meet for the military market.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 29, 2016

Monday, February 29th, 2016

ARM and Xilinx Embedded World highlights; Mobile World Congress news; Sensors are on a roll; What makes MIPI?

Ahead of the ARM Cortex-A32 processor announcement at Embedded World and Mobile World Congress, ARM announced its latest real-time processor IP, the ARM Cortex-R8, designed for LTE-Advanced and 5G designs. Neil Wermuller, ARM goes into detail about the Cortex-R8 quad-core, real-time processor, building on the ARMv7-R architecture.

Also at Embedded World, Mentor Embedded teamed up with Xilinx which used demonstrated the Xilinx ZYNQ 7000 platform, hosting a Nucleus RTOS. Andrew Patterson, Mentor, describes how this can be used in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS)

More power for less dollars is driving demand in the consumer market. Alexandru Voica, Imagination Technologies, explains how the latest additions to the PowerVR series, PowerVR Series8XE meets efficiency and performance requirements.

When someone says “pass the masking tape” do check that it’s not a sensor network. The Atmel team blogs about SensorTape, the MIT Media Lab’s Responsive Environments group project for a sensor network that is on a roll.

Ahead of the MIPI Alliance event (March 7), Hezi Saar, Synopsys looks at what makes up the specification as it moves from the mobile marketplace.

Using a real-life crime to illustrate hazards, ARM’s Simon Segars focused on security at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain last week, reports Paul McLellan, Cadence. Other areas of interest was virtual reality, and an appearance by F1 racing driver, Lewis Hamilton, under the guise of discussing CAN in vehicles and what street cars could learn from F1.

Still with Mobile World Congress, Gary Bronner, Rambus, is quoted in report of the demonstration there of thermal-enabled lensless smart sensor (LSS) technology, by Rambus Labs. With the capability to replace traditional thermal lenses for IoT in medical equipment, manufacturing as well as the less obvious smart cities and transportation, this is a new approach to imaging, driven by computing rather than optics.

Striving to reduce debug effort and increase productivity is a noble cause, championed by Aditya Mittal, Arrow Devices. He looks at the AX13 system bus and its virtues as well as the company’s PDA tool.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, November 16, 2015

Monday, November 16th, 2015

ARM TechCon 2015 highlights: IoT, mbed and magic; vehicle monitoring systems; the road ahead for automotive design

It’s crunch time for IoT, announced ARM CEO Simon Segars at ARM TechCon. Christine Young, Cadence reports on what Segars believes is needed to get the IoT right.

Posing as a ‘booth babe’, Richard Solomon, Synopsys, was also at ARM TechCon demonstrating the latest iteration of DesignWare IP for PCI Express 4.0. As usual, there are pictures illustrating some of the technology, this time around switch port IP and Gen2 PCI, and quirky pictures from the show floor, to give readers a flavor of the event.

Tracking the progress of mbed OS, Chris Ciufo, eecatalog, prowled the mbed Zone at this year’s ARM TechCon, finding IoT ‘firsts’ and updates of wearables.

Enchanted by IoT, Eric Gowland, ARM, found ARM TechCon full of wonder and magic – or, to paraphrase Arthur C Clark, technology that was indistinguishable from magic. There are some anecdotes from the event – words and pictures – of how companies are using the cloud and the IoT and inspiring the next generation of magicians.

Spotting where Zynq devices are used in booth displays, might become an interesting distraction when I am visiting some lesser shows in future. I got the idea from Steve Leibson, Xilinx, who happened upon the Micrium booth at ARM TechCon where one was being used, stopping to investigate, he found out about free μC/OS for Makers.

Back to Europe, where DVCon Europe was help in Munich, Germany (November 11-12). John Aynsley, Doulos, was pleased that UVM is alive and well and companies like Aldec are realising that help and support is needed.

Identifying the move from behavior-based driver monitoring systems to inward-looking, camera-based systems, John Day, Mentor Graphics, looks at what this will use of sensors will mean for automakers who want to combine value and safety features.
Deciding how many functions to offer will be increasingly important for automakers, he advises.

Still with the automotive industry, Tomvanvu, Atmel, addresses anyone designed for automotive embedded systems and looks at what is driving progression for the inevitable self-driving cars.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor

Blog Review – Monday, February 09, 2015

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Arthur C Clarke interview; Mastering Zynq; The HAPS and the HAPS-nots; Love thy customer; What designers want; The butterfly effect for debug

A nostalgic look by at an AT&T and MIT conference, by Artie Beavis, ARM, has a great video interview with Arthur C Clarke. It is fascinating to see the man himself envisage mobile connectivity and ‘devices that send information to friends, the exchange of pictorial information and data; the ‘completely mobile’ telephone as well as looking forward to receiving signals from outer space.

A video tutorial presented by Dr Mohammad S Sadri, Microelectronic Systems Design Research Group at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany, shows viewers how to create AXI-based peripherals in the Xilinx Zynq SoC programmable logic. Steve Liebson, Xilinx posts the video. Dr Sadri may appear a little awkward with the camera rolling, but he clearly knows his stuff and the 23 minute video is informative.

Showing a little location envy, Michael Posner, Synopsys, visited his Californian counterparts, and inbetween checking out gym and cafeteria facilities, he caught up on FPGA-based prototype debug and HAPS.

Good news from the Semiconductor Industry Association as Falan Yinug reports on record-breaking sales in 2014 and quarterly growth. Who bought what makes interesting – and reassuring – reading.

Although hit with the love bug, McKenzie Mortensen, IPextreme, does not let her heart rule her head when it comes to customer relations. She presents the company’s good (customer) relationship guide in this blog.

A teaser of survey results from Neha Mittal, Arrow Devices, shows what design and verification engineers want. Although the survey is open to more respondents until February 15, the results received so far are a mix of predictable and some surprises, all with the option to see disaggregated, or specific, responses for each questions.

From bugs to butterflies, Doug Koslow, Cadence, considers the butterfly effect in verification and presents some sound information and graphics to show the benefits of the company’s SimVision.

Caroline Hayes, Senior Editor


Extension Media websites place cookies on your device to give you the best user experience. By using our websites, you agree to placement of these cookies and to our Privacy Policy. Please click here to accept.